I wrote about a logjam of GURPS that was pending, right? And Pyramid being awesome GURPSiness?

Well, check out the GURPS News. Excerpts from +Sean Punch‘s update (the text in green are his words, copied from the GURPS News) , with a focus on release dates:

With other GURPS material biding its time, it seems appropriate to remind everyone that each monthly issue of Pyramid is a bona fide GURPS supplement. Certainly, it’s sold as a ‘zine, and you can even subscribe. That doesn’t change the fact that it’s 100% official GURPS support, and enjoys the same love and attention as the rest of the game.
Which isn’t to say that we aren’t hard at work on more publications with “GURPS” on the front. Really, we haven’t been slacking off! Here are just some of the projects in the queue. As usual, this is a list of wild-eyed guesses, its order and ETAs subject to change if a butterfly flaps its wings on the Plateau of Leng:

  • Pyramid will continue, of course. Steven Marsh has July’s issue in editing, August’s well in hand, and the three after that just about filled.
  • My most recent major project – Zombies – is enjoying excellent art progress. We might even see the PDF released on e23 before end of summer 2013, though the printed version is further out.
  • Phil Masters and I have finished our review of the preliminary PDFs of his Discworld Roleplaying Game. Much of the art is in already, and the company has elevated this item to a Priority, which may well mean seeing it in 2013.
  • David T. Moore’s Banestorm: Martial Arts is very close to ready . . . in fact, the main thing left to do is decide whether we want to use that title or one that isn’t the titles of two other books mooshed together.
  • Douglas Cole’s Martial Arts: Technical Grappling is next in line for art. Advanced rules for twisting your foes into pretzels could appear before end of summer 2013.
  • Michele Armellini’s Locations: St. George’s Cathedral is getting art, too, so the Locations series might just see a growth spurt before winter 2013.
  • Bill Stoddard’s Thaumatology: Chinese Elemental Powers – which supports both Thaumatology and Powers – also seems plausible for autumn or winter 2013.
  • David Chart’s Transhuman Space: Wings of the Rising Sun is still on target for 2013, if the art situation holds steady.
  • Hans-Christian Vortisch’s High-Tech: Adventure Guns should be out in time to let you restock your armory before 2014.
  • Dan Howard’s Loadouts: Low-Tech Armor also has art deadlines set, but currently looks more like an early 2014 proposition.
  • Ken Hite’s Horror: The Madness Dossier is in editing, so it’s a little further out than all of the above.

Needless to say, with my book finally pending, and possibly by the “end of the Summer 2013,” this is most excellent news!

Been a decent weekend for writing. I’m finally putting three articles to bed that I’ve had in the hopper for a very, very long time.

They’re all weaponry related, hand weaponry at that. One is related to weapon breakage, another on fixing and making weapons, and the last is on tweaking around with armor divisors and wound modifiers on blades. They were one big article at first, but I realized that my tendency to write far-too-complete/complex treatises on stuff had run away with me. Thus: split ’em into discrete pieces, remove some of the links that made it complicated, and thus hopefully produce something that is more usable to more people.

We shall see.

I also really need to get back into my Pathfinder overview. I dumped it in the middle of Chapter 8 (Combat), and I would like to finish that one day.

I’ll be on vacation the last week in July and the first week in August, which means I should have time to bang away at a few bits of some larger works I’d like to do. One on Age of Sail ships and battles, one on healing and medicine, and maybe starting the designer’s notes bits of Technical Grappling (and for those keeping score, that’s me getting ahead of things, not some warning that I’ve got any idea when it’s coming out).

I might also try and restart my internal notes in my Book of Pretentiousness. I’ve let that slide, and while I’ve still got some topics to mine in there, the well’s running a bit dry.

I most often throw down
some sort of tidbit or observation on rules and tinkering with them on
GURPS-Day, but today, my mind is on campaigns.
I’m starting to get the
itch to GM one again. Not out of disappointment with the three in which I’m
playing, but it’s a good way to ensure familiarity with the system, exercise
creative muscles, and generally ensure some proactive social action on my part.
So, with that, what
would I run? Not sure, but some possibilities in no particular order:
Krail’s Folly
The concept of “go
north and conquer the wilderness, and you get lands and title in exchange”
was hashed out a while back, and the game concept carries as much appeal now as
it did then.
I’d vacillate a bit, but
likely come down to using Dungeon Fantasy as the core basis. It is, quite
simply, the best supported part of GURPS, with tons of cool stuff. I’ve also
got a direct line into +Nathan Joy‘s pool of players, far more
experienced in playing this genre than I am. Of course, +Peter V. Dell’Orto is no slouch either, and
since he and I collaborate on stuff on a regular basis rather well, there’s a
monster pool of talent I can go to. Not to mention rules-authors and tinkerers
such as +Antoni Ten Monrós.
What would I bring to
the table? Well, I’d still use Divine Favor for clerical powers, since I
really do love the feel of it. I might tweak out a few things, since as Peter
points out in today’s post over at Dungeon Fantastic, there are a few
potentially fun-killing/fun-reducing aspects of Divine Favor’s Learned Prayers
that could use some tampingdown.
I like the granularity
of the Low-Tech armor and weapons and whatnot, but I am right there with Peter
in thinking that it’s a bit too fiddly. GCA can be used pretty well to design
kits of armor, even very complicated ones. But there’s something rather nice
about NOT having to get crazy with it, and fine tuning each piece gets
complicated.
What about my own rules?
The Deadly Spring for bows is a behind-the-curtain thing. So all that work is
done ahead of time, and won’t interfere with the game much . . . but “realistic”
bows in Dungeon Fantasy? Meh, what’s the point? So I might bypass that in favor
of ridiculous levels of smackdown. More fun that way.
Magic? Ah, there’s the
rub. From what I’ve seen of Ritual Path Magic, I like the feel of the system
but it seems every bit as fiddly as the armor-building issue I talked about
above. I’d be tempted to try a Divine-Favor inspired magic system, but then, really, that’s not that different in fiddly
than Divine Favor or RPM – you’re still creating “spells” based on some sort of
metasystem, and as long as you ruthlessly quash “let me design a spell while I’m
sitting at the table” behavior, it’d probably go fine.
I’d definitely bring on
the Setup Attacks I introduced in Delayed Gratification. I might even eliminate
the RAW Feint entirely. Not sure about that, but likely.
I would probably try to
use Technical Grappling too, since it would be way easier for me to answer future
questions about that book if I’d had experience playing it and adjudicating the
rules!
Would I also do
long-term fatigue and action points, from The Last Gasp? Grar . . . might be
nice, but that would make a LOT of new rules to swallow, and both TLG and TG
require characters to be built with those rules in mind. So I’d probably skip
the Action Point rules this time.
Monster Hunters
This is probably my
favorite genre of all time. It combines creepy horror and magic with a world
that we’re more or less all familiar with, and has the over-the-top  Black Ops feel that I loved when I GM’d that
campaign years ago, without being 1,000-point characters.
I feel like it’s got a
nice combination of swords, guns, and monsters. Action Points and TG would fit
in here pretty well, I’d not have to worry about Low-Tech fiddliness (though I
would have High-Tech fiddles, but that’s rather well defined due to the nature
of it being right-here, right now).
This also lends well to
being an episodic campaign that can see players come and go without too much
pain. Given the variability in modern adult life, I think that would lend
itself well to my needs.
Modern Special Ops
I was Lead Playtester on
Tactical Shooting for a reason: I’m pretty familiar with this trope, and I love
laying out tactical challenges. I could also see doing this as a variable tech
level science fiction setting, Colonial Marines style, and near-future (TL8/9)
Sci Fi is pretty familiar to most people. Hell, given how much fun I had
playing the game, GURPS X-Com would rock on toast.
Parting Shot
I’d obviously see who’d
want to play in each campaign, how often (but no more  than twice a month, but no less frequently
than once every three weeks, I think) and if someone says “hey, wouldn’t it be
cool to run X” and I get inspired, I’m in.
But I really do kind of
want to run a game, and I’d love to get my wife in on it; she’s gamed with me
before and we’ve both enjoyed the experience.
One thing I would do,
however, is have to learn MapTool or Roll20 way, way better. I would also insist
that all players use webcams, because my experience is that the camera experience
is simply better (for me) than the
chat-based games. It’s faster, more social, and for me, more fun.
I’m getting that itch,
though – and it might be time to run something again.

Thursday is GURPS-Day, but I’m glad I was late this week! The inimitable +Sean Punch updated the GURPS thread of his Livejournal, where he gives weekly work-in-progress notes, and this week was a doozy.

Reposting the text here with some formatting changes, he announced:

We set art deadlines and/or release dates for many projects that were moving slowly. I cannot share dates, but I can name titles:

  1. GURPS High-Tech: Adventure Guns, by Hans-Christian Vortisch
  2. GURPS Loadouts: Low-Tech Armor, by Dan Howard
  3. GURPS Locations: St. George’s Cathedral, by Michele Armellin
  4. GURPS Martial Arts: Technical Grappling, by Doug Cole (douglascole)
  5.  GURPS Thaumatology: Chinese Elemental Powers, by Bill Stoddard (whswhs)
  6. GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, by PK (peekitty)
  7. Transhuman Space: Wings of the Rising Sun, by David Chart
  8. A secret item by Warren Wilson; 
  9. Sean’s GURPS Zombies
  10. Unnamed GURPS Power-Ups
  11. Unnamed GURPS Social Engineering
  12. Unnamed GURPS Thaumatology 

That’s a full dozen titles, including my own Technical Grappling. Not named is Banestorm Martial Arts, which I got a look at during peer review (and it’s great fun), but you can also look for other works in this link, which is kept pretty well updated.

But Sean had warned/advised that his last few weeks of “art has made progress” were no accident, and that the scheduling of the Ogre Launch Party cleared the way for some of the production logjam to start moving. 
So there’s lots of great stuff incoming! Hopefully this will be a GURPS-filled summer!

Last post of Melee Academy was on getting into CC range with a grapple in one turn. +Mark Langsdorf picked up on this and showed a higher-percentage option to get into CC that takes two turns, and by his own notes, is really good at negating the hated Defense Bonus of a shield.

Martin Leuschen made a good comment in my post, pointing out (in summary) three issues:

  1. First, low armor DR vs. weapon damage: If full armor was actually proof against most attacks, the historical grapple-takedown-misericorde combo is much more plausible. 
  2. Second, high unarmed lethality: Striking unarmed is better than you might expect, so why grapple?
  3. Third is pacing: Grappling is indeed more likely to be drawn out, so it suffers in comparison to the stuff GURPS allows to be done every round, even if in RL it usually happens in brief flurries.

These observations are well-made, and honestly Technical Grappling probably won’t help here. First, none of these correct observations really have to do with grappling, so much as grappling compared to striking, where striking is found superior in actual play relative to grappling options.

But surely there are effective ways to actually use grappling in fights?

Hard to say. +Peter V. Dell’Orto and I exchanged emails about this topic, and his comments were on-point as usual:

Grappling when you need something to die now, and you have good means of making it die now, is a bad idea.

The problem I have is it’s pretty weak overall, thanks to the number of defenses the attacker gets against throws and grabs, and ability to break out of it. Judo Throw is a good example – if the attacker can’t stop you, it’s too powerful, but if he gets a defense, it generally fails. Realistically they take some setup, though, which is part of the issue. Maybe if they took a setup but where easier once you got the setup, it would be more useful.

Yeah. That starts to hit at some of the things I was realizing as I’ve been playing, even at Dungeon Fantasy point levels. But between Mark’s comments and Peter’s, there might even be some answers in there.

Stop Whining: How can it actually be done?

I think that grappling in the middle of armed combat can be effective, but you’re going to have to work it a bit. It may require a few house rules, though, as well as, perhaps, some legal but a bit munchkiny use of perks. It also might still wind up being less “efficient” or “optimal” than repeatedly striking with a maxed-out weapon skill.

Skills, multiple skills, and perks


I think one of the issues that might be at play here is that it is likely almost always a better option to have one skill that is really good than to have two that are decent but balanced. 

For grappling, I think what it boils down to is that defenses against grappling attacks are no different than any other defense. If you can do a Broadsword or Karate parry vs. a grappling attack at no defensive penalty, or more appropriately, at full defensive ability, then being relatively unfamiliar with grapples and defending against them is not a problem.

Part of this is quite simple: All armed skills are also grappling skills. You don’t need special training to grapple with a weapon, you can do so (make the grapple, that is) by rolling vs. Armed Grapple, at Skill-2. Boom. In an early draft of TG, I’d interpreted that as “treat Broadsword as a grappling skill, but at -2.”

That’s not correct; “Armed Grapple” is the ability to perform the usual GURPS grapple with a weapon. If you hit, your foe as at the usual -4 DX, and you can use any technique that you have the ability to do so using that grapple.

But perhaps a modification here would be to actually do that. Treat uses of (say) Broadsword in a grappling context as an Average technique defaulting to Skill-4 or Skill-6. That would mean using Broadsword to parry a grapple would be at -2 or -3 relative to a real grappling skill, but that a 4- or 6-point investment could make up for it.

Meh. That still wouldn’t drive wanting to branch out into more than one type of skill. Why do I care? Well, some of the earlier MMA matches were pretty one-sided, since lots of people trained in striking only, and got their butts handed to them by grapplers. The strikers didn’t know how to deal with them.

Of course, “I deal with a grappler by smashing him to the ground with my axe” is pretty effective.

One way to get around this is to do what I did for Cadmus: take your best weapon skill, or maybe both your weapon and shield skill, and default favored moves from it by buying a perk. “Judo Throw defaults to Axe” is perfectly legal (confirmed by RPK and it shows up in TG as well). The oft-seen “he slams into me and I flip him over myself with my shield” trick – I believe I’ve seen this in Gladiator, Braveheart, and in 300 – would be the perfect application of this.

Negating defenses


Of course, it still hasn’t worked out well for me in play. Peter’s point about multiple chances to defend, break free, and otherwise negate the grappler’s attack bears some consideration too.

So, what to do?

Well, if defenses are the issue, we have a few possibilities, and only one of them involves a rules tweak.

The tweak: Let Riposte stack with Deceptive Attack. It never occurred to me that this wasn’t allowed, and frankly shouldn’t break anything anyway.

OK, so clearly if the problem is that it’s just too darn easy to foil the grapple, then it’s time to start stacking up penalties. The goal here will be to follow up a weapon attack with a grapple and throw. Remember that Judo Throw can occur if you’re within a yard of your foe, that is, Reach 1. I don’t see the rules stating you must step into CC either.

Feint version

Let’s assume two fighters, both Skill-18, no Combat Reflexes, with DB +2 shields; Parry-14, or 15 with a retreat. I’m going to steal a page from Mark’s playbook – we’ll include something sneaky:

Turn 1, Step 1: Bash your foe

Your first offensive option is to hit them hard with something. This imposes a shock penalty. This is up to -4.

Turn 2, Step 2: Fake ‘im out

You’ll need to parry a blow, presumably, between your first successful attack and your Feint.

Shock canonically does not impact Active Defenses, but does lower DX and skill use. So your second step, while your foe is suffering from shock, is to Feint. This does impact defenses on the following turn, effectively translating the -4 Shock to -4 to defenses. All of them.

Step 1 and 2: Bash and Feint: If you can afford the penalties, consider doing both of these in one turn with Rapid Strike. 

Turn 2, Step 3: Riposte on your foe’s blow

OK, so your foe’s next defense suffers from your Feint. Now, on your next defense, you’ll want to parry the incoming blow, and Riposte to impart a further penalty. This won’t be much, probably only -1 or if you’re feeling lucky, -2. Still, if that stacks with Feint, that’s up to -6.

Turn 3, Step 4: Deceptive Attack on Judo Throw

Hey, look – you’ve just parried a blow, so you can employ Judo Throw using an Attack/Defense roll. Go ahead and throw in with a Committed Attack (Determined) for +2, and then lay down a -3 Deceptive Attack penalty. Your foe is now looking at -9 to defend, so his Parry is reduced from about a 15 (good luck with that) down to a 6. Even if he’s a Dodge Monkey with Dodge-15, he’s still only defending one time in 10.

So you throw him, and he has to make his HT roll to resist stun. If you want, throw him for damage, but mainly you’re hoping for the stun.

Turn 3, Step 5: Defend if he’s not stunned

He’s prone now, attacking at -4 and defending at -3. If you can Riposte on this one, you should. He might choose to Change Posture to kneeling, but if that’s the case you’re not worrying about getting hit.

Turn 4, Step 6: Nail him (this is Step 5 if he’s stunned)

You’re dealing with at least -2 (kneeling) and possibly as much as -5 (prone and suffering from a -2 riposte). Here, you will perhaps be looking at Telegraphic Committed (’cause I dont’ like to give up all my defenses) attacks to sensitive bits – choice locations like neck or skull, or chinks in armor. You can do AoA or Committed for extra damage, but personally, I think that the x3 or x4 multiplier you’ll get from locations (or the DR/2 you get from chinks) is the better bet here

Setup Attack version


For those who like Setup Attacks, from Delayed Gratification, this provides another pathway.

Turn 1, Step 1: Setup Attack


Launch a setup attack with your primary weapon. Your attack must succeed in order for the penalties to transfer, and you’re not necessarily worrying about damage . . .but you will want to leverage Riposte. Let’s say you throw that Setup as a Defensive Attack, assigning the +1 to Parry. At Skill-18, you can throw down with a -2 setup. Let’s assume your attack succeeds, but your foe thwarts the attack (though YOU might be looking at a -1 or -2 to your own next defense, since he can Riposte as well).

If you hit, then he’s suffering from shock, which doesn’t hurt his defenses, but will make him either back off or  at least succeed by less. Cap of -4 on shock means he’s still Skill-14 and Parry-14, so pretty capable.

Turn 1, Step 2: Riposte

If he attacks, parry him. You’ll be looking at, again, up to about a -3 (rolling vs 12 or 13) penalty you’re trying to stack via the Riposte, on top of the -2 from your previous setup. How does that work? With defensive attack and a Retreating parry, you can roll vs. a 13 with a -3 Riposte penalty.

Turn 2, Step 3: Judo Throw

Again, you’ve just parried a blow, so you can proceed to a Throw. Your foe is up to -2 from the setup, -3 from the Riposte, and then you can pile on another -2 from a Deceptive Attack this turn. Total of up to -7, but it takes one less turn to accomplish. Also, you’ll see that the Step 2 Riposte can be pretty even up, and you might not gain much. I’d say on the average, you’re looking at -4 or -5 here, but still.

Your foe will thus be resisting the Judo Throw at an upper end of about Parry-11 (still you only land it one time in three), but if things go well, could be looking at as low as Parry-7 (one time in six).

Parting Shot


These tactics I’m sure aren’t perfect, and other options are available. But it’s pretty clear that unless you’re facing mooks, you’re going to need to work it in order to leverage a dynamic grapple in a lethal combat situation. It’s also not clear to me that, in the end, the best strategy isn’t just to repeatedly use that optimum swing to the neck over and over and over. It’s boring as hell, but it’s efficient.

The key seems to be tweaking the rules a bit, and finding a series of moves that allow you to pile on enough penalties to make that throw irresistible. Of course, if your throw is irresistible, so is a coup de grace with a sword. The purpose of the throw, then, is likely to allow a second-line fighter to act as the finisher while he’s stunned or incapable of defending. A handy spear or poleaxe on a prone and stunned foe seems like a good way for your front-line guy to move on to the next victim.

Welcome to the second installment of Melee Academy!

Grappling seems pretty cool. The benefits for throwing someone to the ground are pretty impressive in GURPS. They have to spend a few turns getting up (unless then can Acrobatic Stand), while prone they’re at -4 on their hit rolls and -3 while defending. While kneeling, which the probably have to do to stand up, they’re at -2 to both. If you can throw them hard enough via Judo Throw, you may either stun or damage them.

But grappling in combat is harder then it would seem. For one thing, on the scale of GURPS combat, it can take a while. While a strike that successfully lands gets its damage (and attendant shock penalties) a grapple in a lethal combat “only” imparts -4 to DX, with the attendant -2 to Parry/Block and -1 to Dodge that comes from that reduction.

Part of the trick is that you have to get close – enter your foe’s hex – and stay there. Grappling is, mostly, done at Reach C, in Close Combat. That can be a very dangerous place to be for both foes.

Getting to that range can be tricky. Getting to that range without avoiding getting murderized can be very tricky.

Consider: approaching a guy with a sword, or worse yet, a sword and a knife. If he sees you coming, he can Wait, and attack you as you step to Reach 1. If you’re unarmed, or unarmored, you’ll face the dreaded “unarmed parry vs. weapons” thing, where all of his parries are automatically aggressive. He can possibly poke at you a few times if he has a long sword with Reach 1,2.

Closing the Distance

 A – Attacker Steps     B – Wait trigger      C  – Close Combat      D – Foe retreats



So, what to do? Well, you can try and Wait. The condition of your Wait is that you will Step and Attack to grapple. Technically, this is your attack on your own turn, and your foe does get to defend. This runs into the “unarmed parry” rule. But it does allow you to get into close combat.

However, your foe may retreat, and if your grapple fails, he’s still in perfect smackdown range. So you’ll do an obvious Wait, as shown by figure A. When your foe steps into range, triggering your Wait, you can step into Close Combat if you haven’t moved at all yet (p. B385 makes this explicit). Notionally, this box disallows the “Step and Wait” strategy, but that’s not what you’re going for here, so it doesn’t matter.

So, you can proceed from A to C by triggering your Wait – but it’s your turn, not your foe’s, so he can defend, including by Retreating (D). If he does this and your grapple has failed, he’s in perfect beat-down position with a Reach 1 weapon.

Committed Attack


You’re stepping into close combat with an angry orc with a sword. You’re already committed, and maybe fit to be committed too, so you might as well choose the Committed Attack option (Martial Arts, p. 99-100) and pick the two steps option. This allows you to follow your foe as he retreats and step back into his hex, if you absorb the -2 to hit stacked on to whatever Committed Option you’ll be using.

Make no mistake, though, this is dangerous, since while he is in Reach C for you (and thus maybe his weapons are either ineffective of less effective), he isn’t grappled yet if you’ve missed.

The Committed Attack option also allows the Wait strategy to be employed against a weapon with Reach 1,2 – but of course you will end at C instead of D, having burned your movement getting to C the first time.

Be Offensive


Another version of Wait uses Committed Attack to shoot in and grapple your foe as soon as he steps up to A. He can still defend, and he retains his step, so I’d judge this slightly less desirable, since he can step back and still have reserved his retreat.

Grappled, Now What


We’re assuming a swirling many-party melee here, not a ritualized fight in the octagon, or a 1-1 duel. So now that you’ve got him, you have more work to do.

The usual options are Takedowns and Locks. Both can usually be treated as (or actually are) attacks, so if you’re awesome you can probably Rapid Strike with them. The issue here is that it’s another skill roll, a Contest for Takedown, and an attack roll (which can be defended against) for Locks.

You can see the problem, though. You’re looking at three separate actions to get any sort of impact.

The lock options are particularly attractive using Throws from Locks, though. They inflict swing damage. If you do it right, and use Head Lock, you do swing damage to the neck. That’s pretty good, but again, takes time.

Instant Gratification

There are a couple options that seem like pretty good plays that don’t require multiple turns, but they do require a bunch of things to go right.

Judo Throw


The notional 900-lb gorilla of the grappling world in GURPS is the Judo Throw. The benefits cannot be denied. You parry weapons at no penalty. You get +3 when doing a Judo parry on a retreat, and unlike many other grappling moves, you may Judo Throw if your foe is within one yard, that is, it’s basically a Reach 1 grappling attack. Notionally, then, you parry an attack that you probably needed to parry anyway, and then make an attack roll. If successful, your foe is on the ground, and on a failed HT roll, he’s stunned. This probably ignores many types of armor, and if you’re good, you can throw for damage by targeting a location, and the head is always popular here.

Swept Away


This one is interesting, in that in one turn (but still the same number of rolls) you get the benefit of a grapple and takedown without actually having to grapple the guy. Also, if you’re strong and have Power Grappling, you can make a ST-based Sweep roll instead. This will knock someone down, but never stun or injure them, so it’s a benefit, but a limited one.

“Never Tell Me the Odds”


The struggle here is that many of these moves require several linked rolls, all of which must work in order for these moves to be effective. You must first Parry, and then make a successful attack isn’t really a departure from striking. But toss in the HT roll for stunning and your foe can weasel out of one of the big reasons to do this sort of move.

Even with proper perk selection (Judo Throw defaults to Axe/Mace, for example) and Axe-20, my Warrior Saint in +Nathan Joy‘s Dungeon Fantasy game has never really pulled off one of the cool moves. Too many things seem to have to go right.

The mix of attack/defense and Quick Contest is also interesting, since the odds aren’t exactly always intuitive. Also, sometimes you can choose between them: Judo Throw can be done after a Judo Parry by making an attack roll, but after a grapple (you attack and they fail their defense roll) you can toss someone by winning a Quick Contest.

Which do you prefer? Which should you prefer?

Contests

A contest is pretty straight-foward, and is “who wins by more.” The odds of winning a contest where both combatants are of equal skill and no modifiers (so effective skill 14 is rolling vs. effective skill 14) is basically 50%. Where margin of success matters (and it will matter a lot once Technical Grappling comes out), the odds of you winning a disparate contest (Skill-16 vs Skill-14) by the difference in skills (that is, win the above contest by 2) is also 50%. So I’ll use that 50% benchmark to give a feel for things. But basically, you’re going to be looking at the balance of skills, and the higher yours is over your foe’s (and that might be skill vs. ST or HT or best grappling skill, or something that gives each the best opportunity). Contests, then, work best when you have the advantage.

Attack-Defense Roll



It might not be strictly comparable, but what are the probabilities of an attack actually landing, taking account lowering the probability of success on the attack itself to 90% via Deceptive Attack? Well, you can see that the region of the curve that is green, giving more than 50% chance of a successful attack, seems more limited. You have to be careful though, since Active Defense scores are figured as 3+Skill/2. That is listed in the “Raw Skill” section, and you can see that at Attack Skill-20 (and a -6 Deceptive Attack), you’ll cross over the 50% probability mark at roughly Skill-19. On the flip side, you will never get where you want to be unless you start with more than 50% chance to hit.

Finally, you can see that if the foe can retreat (+1), has Combat Reflexes or Enhanced Defenses (+1), and perhaps takes All-Out Defense or has a medium shield (each with +2), that all of a sudden, scoring that hit drops below 50% at a defender’s skill of only 10 . . . because 3+10/2 + 1 + 1 + 2 = 12, the same way that a raw skill of 18 gives a defense roll of 12.

All of this is obviated if your foe has just All-Out Attacked. Then, it’s all about your skill, since your foe has no defenses. In this case, Attack-Defense rolls are where it’s at (many Contests either explicitly or implicitly will allow a roll vs ST-4 or HT even if you’ve All-Out Attacked).

What it means: Learn Hand Catch if you can!


If your foe has the space to retreat, has enhanced defenses, is carrying a shield, or all-out defending (or a combination of all of those), you’re going to want to seek opportunities to engage in contests rather than attack-defense pairs. That means you’ll want to start the turn having already grappled your foe. But to grapple, you have to contend with your foe’s sky-high defenses, right?

Not with Hand Catch (Martial Arts, p. 84). If you can get it, and if you can make the roll (Judo Parry – 7 to intercept a sword!) you can then make another roll at full skill to grab the foe. That means your foe has attacked you, you’ve parried and grappled him, and on your next turn you can Judo Throw from Reach 1, step in and do a Takedown, both leveraging the Quick Contest, which neturalizes the benefit of a lot of those defense bonuses.

The enweaponed equivalent of this is probably Bind Weapon. If you can trap the weapon (and it’s “only” at Parry-1.5 (Parry = 3 + Bind Weapon/2, or 3+(Skill-3)/2) as a GM I’d say that is a grapple. It becomes win/win. Either your foe relinquishes his weapon at any time as a free action, or he keeps it and you can proceed to resolution by Contest. The key on this one is a jitte, jutte, or sai. Check out Martial Arts pp. 67-68 for more details.

Parting Shot


It may just be that my dice have not been friendly. But even with high skill, I’ve found that some of the cool features of grappling don’t work out well in practice over the ever-popular bashing someone in the face with an axe.

The key is to try and find situations where you can leverage your foe’s actions, arm yourself with the right stuff, and partner with the right people. Throw your foe down, and have a second-ranker impale him or chop him with a Telegraphic All-Out Attack for damage. He’s at -3 to defend and maybe stunned, and that’s a great way for a second-line fighter to contribute – as a finisher.

More Melee Academy Links


Other contributions can be found:

Dungeon Fantastic – +Peter V. Dell’Orto writes about Stop Hit
Orbs and Balrogs – +Christian Blouin writes about creating and holding combat initiative
RPG Snob – +Jason Packer throws down about combat pacing
No School Grognard – +Mark Langsdorf  provides a two-turn option that gets you into close combat with a higher success rate than the one-turn option I provide in this article.

A recent post in the forums, which started off with a link to this very blog – specifically my old post on how ST rolls are problematic in GURPS, brought up a very interesting edge case that I really wish had come up explicitly in the Technical Grappling playtest.

It has to do with scale.

The Issue



Take a ST 1 or 2, DX 10 snake that is trying to make a Constriction attack against a ST 1, HT 10 pixie. Many of these contests will pit ST for the attacker against the ST or HT of the defender, whichever is better.

Huh. ST 1 or 2 will always roll vs. HT 10, and so the extrinsic nature of ST bites you hard here, since you’ll never have a creature contest like this end poorly for the HT 10 pixie. This is especially interesting since ST 2 vs. ST 1 is the same ST ratio as ST 20 vs ST 10.

The Solution


GURPS has buried within it in a few places a recommendation to re-scale oddball ST values centered around 10 for places where things get weird. So ST 1 vs. ST 1 or ST 2 vs. ST 1 would turn into ST 10 vs. 10 or even ST 20 vs. ST 10, which re-centers the contests around the norm of 10, which turns the equal-ST contest into something appropriate.

OK, so boom, rescale. We’re good, right?

Well, perhaps good enough, but in keeping with the concept of “ST rolls must die,” here’s another way.

Power Ratio Table


What we’ll do is take a look at the ratio of the Basic Lift of the two combatants, and assign a modifier based on that ratio to one or both of the combatants. Thus, Contests of ST (or ST-based skill) vs. the best of ST or HT will mostly turn into a Contest of DX (or maybe HT)-based Skill vs. HT, but with a modifier to ST.

This is basically the same as “normalize the defender’s ST to 10, and take that as a penalty

Another way to go – though similar – is to just take the ratio of the stronger to the weaker. Unfortunately, the math is a little ugly.

1. Take the log10 of the ratio of stronger to weaker. Call that PR
2. Modifier = PR * (9.5+10.8*PR)

That produces something like this:

I’d probably just modify the skill of the attacker – if he’s stronger (he’s on the favorable end of the ratio) he gets a bonus. If he’s on the weaker end of the ratio, he gets a penalty.

Snake vs. Pixie Revisited


The ST 1, DX 10 snake vs. the ST 1, HT 10 pixie is now at a 1:1 ratio, no penalty or bonus, and this becomes DX 10 vs. HT 10 (the fact that the snake is using Constriction Attack would probably be treated as a ST multiplier of some sort in this case).

This would be the same math you’d do for a ST 50, DX 10 giant putting the squeeze on another ST 50, HT 10 giant.

Icky Math. Why did it have to be Icky Math?


I just banged this out because I wanted to preserve the +1 bonus for each +1 to ST in the regime of most PCs. I could probably find a nicer functional relationship between the ST Ratio, BL Ratio, or Log of one or both of those ratios if we don’t want a +1 to the slightly stronger guy for each +1 to ST vs. a ST 10 baseline. We might also invert that, where you might get slightly more of a penalty or bonus from ST10 (no bonus) to ST 20 (currently +10 relative to a ST 10 guy).

Hopefully that would give nicer math. Naturally I’d see if I can use the Size and Speed/Range table here, since my thoughts on that are well known.

But that should help with normalizing oddball ST scores to the more 10-centric HT and DX. It also gets rid of a direct ST roll, and that makes me happy.

I just reread the first ten pages of Technical Grappling. 

Damn, this thing is dense. I mean, I wrote it and all, but there’s a lot packed into a small space.

I hope people like it.

And no, I don’t know when it’s coming out either. Even if I did, I couldn’t say. So there.

Not much of a post today, but I started reading TG again after a forum post made me look something up. I found a few simple errors, which naturally SJG let me correct instantly. Good for both of us.

Ah, yes. Cabaret Chicks on Ice.

The joke-title for GURPS Low-Tech for quite a while on the SJG Forums.

Recently, since it seems like forever (but only seems that way) since my manuscript went into the queue in production and saw the rough PDF go around, I’ve been going crazy waiting for the Big Damn Ogre to get out of the way. -)

It’s my own fault. I pledged too.

But to pass the time, I’ve been leaking content here and there. Mostly nothing too revealing. I don’t want to overstep my bounds, nor give away too much from the book. It’s a book covering a lot of rules, and if you give away the rules, you give away the game.

Still, I did reveal one or two more concrete hints, such as a discussion on whether the damage from throws and locks was too high relative to the ease of obtaining a grapple.

I also posted something that was in an original draft, and then cut, because, well, it doesn’t have much to do with grappling.

The Secret Diaries of Technical Grappling• The generic penalty for kicking (-2) assumes a torso level kick – presumably the lower torso. Instead, you may kick anything at SM-4 and lower at no penalty, and each SM higher at an additional -1. Kicking to the head is thus -4, while stomping a grounded foe is not penalized!

One of the OTHER reasons this didn’t work is that SM does not equal height, which was how I was treating it. Still, what this does is say for human-sized critters, you can do whatever you want at knee level and down at no penalty to DX, from hips to knees at -1, abdomen and groin at -2, chest at -3, and head at -4.

This was even there in the first place to give a counter and reason to not grapple: avoiding being curb-stomped.

There is also some commentary about stability, but that is in terms of “if you are in an unstable posture, and someone’s exerting control over you, you’re easier to take down.”

And another rule, fun for people who really want to get to the point:

Impaling
Weapons capable of impaling damage can also be used to
control an opponent. If an impaling object is left inside a foe
(either voluntarily or by getting stuck, see Picks, p. B405), it is
considered to have inflicted CP equal to basic damage. These CP
may not be spent, but impart active and referred control, and
definitely allow actions such as Shoving People Around (p. 00)
and Force Posture Change (p. 00)! You may also use Inflicting
More Pain with Locks (p. 00): Roll a Quick Contest of Trained ST
vs. HT, adding half the original injury as a bonus to your Trained
ST. Apply pain using the full margin of victory!

Edit: Since people are visiting this page again, I thought I’d expand the hint to include the entire thing, just to show a bit more about what’s under the hood. 


But for those not familiar, here was the playtest announcement for the book:

GURPS Martial Arts: Technical Grappling puts the current grappling rules in an arm bar until they bang on your desk in submission! The supplement introduces a few new rules that allow grappling to be treated as a continuum of control rather than being “grappled” and “not grappled,” and seeks to find pressure points in the rules for posture and position.

It explains how to model increasing control over an opponent, a different approach to grappling with different parts of the body, and a completely new top-to-bottom take on grappling with weapons. It adds new perks and techniques where appropriate, and revisits existing rules to ensure compatibility with the new ones!

Why pimp the book when there’s really no telling when it will come out (again: Big. Damn. Ogre)? It’s come up a few times on the forums recently, so I was in a TG frame of mind.

What’s going to be in it?

  • A bunch of stuff on strength and how it impacts grappling ability/skill
  • New variable-effect rules so you can achieve a sucky grapple, or a great one. 
  • Lots of detail on posture and position; it’s important in real-world grappling, and it’s important in the new rules
  • An entire chapter on grappling with weapons
  • it revisits, where appropriate, virtually everything in the Basic Set and GURPS Martial Arts to make sure it’s compatible
  • Includes some lenses and styles. Including styles for snakes, cats, dogs, and bears.
I’m looking forward to it seeing publication. But the title of this post? Recently, because there’s lots of discussion on fighting and combat on the SJG Forums, and most fighting and combat involves grappling at some point, my book has come up a lot, usually with me saying “Oh, yes . . . that’ll be covered in Technical Grappling!” 
So one poster referred to it as Cabaret Chicks on Ice Strikes Back. Which I thought was awesome.

Added: I posted another leak  for some rules on disarming. They’re not much of a rules extension from the current ones, but take the same principles and make them cover more stuff.