Thursday is GURPSDay and once again I’m doing this one from Korat, Thailand, thanks to the always-able assistance of my lovely wife. It’s a day late because work got busy then I had to bolt for the airport hotel, but now I’m in one place for a day of pre-flight layover. Pre-over? Statis? Whatever.

So: GURPSDay!

Welcome to the second year of GURPSDay, and here’s the pull for this week.

We’re currently drawing content from 90 blogs. We picked up a new one: RadBox Studio, and as always, new blogs are listed first. Only 10 more to go until we’re pulling from 100! But we’ll need your help. And if you just started a GURPS blog – and I know that some of you have – email me and get on the list!

How? Two action items: post more, recruit more. It’s really that simple. More posters is more posts, and more interest in GURPS.

Below you can find the blog activity for the last week. There’s a whole lotta awesome GURPS going on. Read all the posts.

Not every blog posts about GURPS every week, but some are ridiculously prolific! The list is randomized, so different bloggers will be highlighted at the top of the post each week.

As always, if you’re interested in having your blog consolidated here, navigate over to The Instructions Page and drop me a line. Take special note of the RSS Settings Fix if you’re on WordPress.
Continue reading “GURPSDay Summary Oct 14 – Oct 20, 2017”

These rules are a literal blast from my past being well over a decade old, from the days when I ran many many games of D6 Star Wars and my own D6 Star Wars / D6 Fantasy / Kitchen Sink inspired D6 Space Fantasy.   Cinema offering like Star Wars, and games like Dark Forces, X-Com (especially Apocalypse), and MechWarrior feature generous amounts of brightly colored rapid fire death and destruction, which I felt the D6 system needed a better approach to bringing to life.   I also wanted to give players even more play options at the table for ‘I shoot the guy’, without making automatic weapons fire into a complex minigame.   I also did not    

These rules have all been extensively playtested and to my mind work very swimmingly, with the caveat I like and encourage grand fireworks shows of automatic weaponry.   They also make automatic weapons in the hands of skilled marksmen a very awesome thing, and make blazing away a very good idea as the only drawback is the occasional burnt action reloading and needing extra ammo.  If you want a squad of stormtroopers dropped in a hail of blaster bolts in a single action by the mighty hero these are your rules!   If you want rules firmly grounded in reality . .  . these are probably not your rules.

D6 Autofire Rules

For all choices, the make by X over numbers can be decreased by whatever nifty widgets reduce recoil in the setting of choice.  Note, while the rules below mention hexes, hex maps are not required, simply use the abstract unit spacing representations of choice, yards, squares, hexes, inches etc.

Standard Autofire Attack – A normal attack to increase damage by attempting to land more than one round, it uses 1 action.

Declare how much ammo you will use before rolling.  

  • If you make the attack by 0-4, nothing special occurs, normal damage.
  • If make  the attack by 5 over, and fired at least 3 rounds, +1d damage.
  • By 10 over, and at least 6, +2d damage,
  • By 15 over, and at least 9, +3d and so on.  

This assumes an automatic weapon.

For semi-automatic and double-action and whatnot, see above but replace 5, 10, 15 and so on by 10, 20, 30 and so on.

Spray Attack

A normal attack with intent to better your chances of landing a hit through multiple rounds.

Declare how much ammo you will use before rolling, then get +1d to attack for every 3 rounds expended.

This uses 1 action and requires an automatic weapon.

Sweep Attack

An attack to sweep across a group of enemies in sequence to engage multiple targets.

Declare how many enemies attacking, all enemies must be in a row more

or less, though vacant hexes are acceptable. Declare the order the enemies are to be engaged, from left to right or right to left.  Ammo cost is 3 rounds per enemy and vacant hex between enemies.

Only one attack rolled is made, and compared against all targets.   The damage is base damage.

First target needs 5 over to hit, 2nd target needs 10 over, 3rd target needs 15 over and so on.  This uses 1 action and requires an automatic weapon.

Area Saturation Attack

This is an attack to engage multiple targets by filling the area they occupy with shear weight of rounds.rather than attacking them directly.

The hexes attacked must be contiguous and there is a minimum of 5 hexes.   Hexes may or may not be occupied, but the cost in rounds must be paid for each hex.

A single attack roll is made, and compared against all targets.

Three levels are possible.

  • Light – requires 3 rounds per hex.  The attack must be made by 10, and damage is reduced by 1d as attacks into the general area are less likely to hit individual targets and the damages may not be square hits or may be flying debris.
  • Moderate – requires 6 rounds per hex.   The attack must be made by 5, and damage is base damage.
  • Heavy – requires 9 rounds per hex,  The attack must be made by 0,, and damage is base damage.  Also, if the attack roll is 10 over, damage is base +1d.

Creating Automatic Weapons (Optional)

In D6 Star Wars and other D6 products, often a weapons nature as an automatic weapon is subsumed into its stats.    For instance, a Star Wars Light Repeating Blaster may do 6d damage have ammo capacity of 25, since 25 ammo is rather low for a squad support weapon in a setting where normal rifles have 100 round capacity, it is very likely that 6D comes from multiple shots at once.  You could say reduce the weapons damage to 5D and increase ammo to 100 and allow the weapon to use these rules.   

Comments

I haven’t used these rules in years . . . but, I could still remember them even before I found my old writeup!   I had a lot of fun with these back then, as these rules were used for years with many a hail of fire from a blaster rifle.   Since I am now a pretty dedicated GURPS player, I notice my old D6 rules split ‘make it easier to hit’ and ‘give chances for more damage’ into two separate options,  while in GURPS firing away with automatic fire does both at the same time!   Some of the inspiration for this comes from D20 Arsenal by Perpetrated Press, an excellent book for magical gatling guns and other fun toys for your D20 needs, a book sadly out of print.

Thursday is GURPSDay and I’m doing this one from Korat, Thailand, thanks to the always-able assistance of my lovely wife.

So: GURPSDay!

Welcome to the second year of GURPSDay, and here’s the pull for this week.

We’re currently drawing content from 89 blogs. Only 11 more to go until we’re pulling from 100! But we’ll need your help. And if you just started a GURPS blog – and I know that some of you have – email me and get on the list!

How? Two action items: post more, recruit more. It’s really that simple. More posters is more posts, and more interest in GURPS.

Below you can find the blog activity for the last week. There’s a whole lotta awesome GURPS going on. Read all the posts.

Not every blog posts about GURPS every week, but some are ridiculously prolific! The list is randomized, so different bloggers will be highlighted at the top of the post each week.

As always, if you’re interested in having your blog consolidated here, navigate over to The Instructions Page and drop me a line. Take special note of the RSS Settings Fix if you’re on WordPress.
Continue reading “GURPSDay Summary Oct 6 – Oct 13, 2017”

I was on the Geek Gab Game Night podcast just a few moments ago. Nearly two hours on adventure design and other topics – we didn’t hold ourselves tightly to a particular theme. As always, it was a hoot interacting with my gracious hosts, and it definitely plays out as a conversation rather than a lecture!

Give a listen, and of course, support Lost Hall of Tyr!

Josh Beckelhimer is an early backer of the project. He requested and received an early preview copy of the adventure, and reviewed it in detail at his website Fantastical Beckelhimer. I have reproduced the entire review below, but have also made some comments where appropriate to address some of his open questions. Thanks to Josh for the review!

A Review – Lost Hall of Tyr (Kickstarter Edition)

As I am writing this up Lost Hall of Tyr: A 5e Adventure (Dungeon Grappling support) just needs less than $400 to be funded. If you read my previous post you know that I am pretty excited about this project.

Gaming Ballistic: About $225 to go as of this post!

Also, Douglas Cole sent me a Review Copy for me to read through. And these are my spoiler free thoughts on it.

In this current state Lost Hall of Tyr is 52 pages (not including the cover and back cover).

  • Introduction/Background – 4 pages
  • Adventure – 19 pages
  • Wilderness Travel Rules – 3 pages
  • Bestiary – 16 pages
  • Quick Start: Dungeon Grappling – 2 pages
  • Preface/Legal Jargon/Table of Contents/Art
  • Placeholder Pages – the rest of the pages

First, and like my previous post, the layout is great. The coloring and the borders for the layout really have set the bar on what a 5th Edition adventure should look like. Yes, a thousand times better than WotC’s layouts for their adventures.

Gaming Ballistic: I expect a page of Kickstarter Backers, at least six pages of maps, a page of scenario flowchart, Table of Contents (no index) as a first pass as to extra pages beyond simple adventure content. If we start punching through stretch goals, the page count may increase.

Introduction/Background

This section gives a brief description of the setting and where the adventure will take place. And rumor has it there is a campaign setting in the works for where this adventure takes place.

Also, there is a brief story that sets up the adventure and the hook for the characters. There is also information on how to tie this adventure into your own setting. Though, there are two things I want to address:

  • 1. No where in the Introduction or the Preface does it state what level the characters should be and how many characters the adventure is designed for.
  • 2. There is a weapon mentioned in the introduction, “magical against all foes and as a +1 magical weapon against a creature type.” (I left out the type of weapon and creature type) But I don’t know if it is meant to be +1 against all foes and a +2 against the creature type or is it supposed to be treated as non-magical +0 against all foes except magical +1 against the creature type.

Gaming Ballistic: Fair cop on the scenario parameters; it was supposed to be printed on the back cover, which isn’t done yet. It’s designed around 4-6 characters of Level 3-6, and I’ll make sure that’s reiterated in the interior of the book.

For the sword, one of the neat things about 5e is that a weapon can be magical but provide no bonuses – there are several spells and power-ups that let mundane weapons strike foes as if they were magical, and this matters for creatures who have resistance or immunity to damage from non-magical weapons. So the sword is magical against just about anything. It gets a small bonus against a particular type of creature owing to how it was created. 

Adventure

*When reading through this the maps were not included just the placeholders for where they would be.*  

First, there is something that needs to be addressed before I continue on with this section. There is NO flavor text. As in, there is no blocked text that is dedicated to the GM to read to the players. Personally, this doesn’t bother me at all. This might be a turnoff for some but I think this also helps with adapting this adventure into whatever setting the GM is running.

I like the writing layout Douglas has done with this adventure. He has created four different categories that helps the GM with running the adventure.

  • Challenges – Describes the challenges that the PCs will have to overcome in this section. Whether it is NPCs or an obstacle that is their way.
  • Concealed – Describes some skill checks they may be needed to achieve a challenge. Also information that may be hidden from the PCs.
  • Alternatives – Describes some alternative ways to deal with the challenge in the section.
  • Rewards – Describes the rewards/treasure the PCs can find in this section. Some rewards are just being able to bypass the challenge.

Though, this adventure was written for 5th edition, there is enough information with this writing layout that the adventure could easily be converted to another system.

Wilderness Travel

This section of the book shouldn’t be treated as something optional. Surviving in the wilderness is essential to this adventure. This adventure is a fairly long trek and a challenge within itself. In this section there are all sorts of rules and information on how to survive in the wilderness. Such as, how much food/water the PCs should have, hunting/gathering, preserving food, weather and climate. Again, this shouldn’t be optional in this adventure.

Gaming Ballistic: I’m very glad that Josh likes the additional wilderness travel guidance. However, for groups that are more of the “let’s just kill some bad guys already!” variety, it’s quite possible to play without using these. In general, though, I think that being able to use the environment as a potentially deadly challenge adds some real flavor and spice to a scenario, and I’ve tried to make it more meaty with the addition of the section on Wilderness Travel.

Bestiary  

This section of the book describes all the NPCs that will be found in this adventure. There is a description for each NPC and their stat blocks. There are familiar monsters that most GMs should know but some of them have been modified to fit this campaign setting. Such as, the goblinoids are considered fae in this setting. There are a total of fifteen NPCs in the Bestiary.

Gaming Ballisitc: One fun note here is that the final PDF will make extensive use of hyperlinks for navigation. So when you see (for example) there are 18 (or 18,000) goblins, you’ll see it as “18 goblins will attack the party,” or the equivalent, with the (curently italicized) goblins taking you directly to the bestiary entry. There will also be return navigation, so you can hop back to the encounters that have the monster. There’s plenty of room for this in the layout, but of course it’ll have to wait for the final layout until we implement it.

Quick Start: Dungeon Grappling

This section of the book is also very important and shouldn’t be ignored or treated as optional. Douglas has created an awesome system when it comes to grappling. The preface of this adventure also describes the importance of this system. If you get this adventure and you plan on running it I highly recommend that you read through this quick start guide and know how Dungeon Grappling works and then show your players how it works. Some of the Challenges in this adventure use this system so it is important to know. Encourage your players to take advantage of this system. You can learn more about Dungeon Grappling here.

Gaming Ballistic: There’s no doubt I love me some grappling – especially when it’s the monsters doing the grappling. And eating. Or dragging you back to its lair. But while I think the grappling rules (“DnD grappling rules that don’t suck!”) are excellent and add a lot of dimensions to the scenario, they are optional. I mean, you should use them. And you should love them. But if you don’t, well . . . the scenario is still fully usable.

I didn’t have any art or the maps but from this Review Copy I could run this adventure now without any of the maps. And that is an important thing to me; being able to just use the text to run an adventure. I look forward to receiving both my PDF and Physical Copy after it is completed. There is still plenty of time to back this project. $7 for PDF backer level and $20 for PDF and Physical Copy backer level. Also, the more money this project receives the more that will be added to it!

Gaming Ballistic’s Final Word:

Thanks to Josh for writing this review of Lost Hall of Tyr. I’m glad my enthusiasm for the adventure comes through, and he’s correct that this is based on the campaign setting for my Dragon Heresy RPG, which is 400,000 words and roughly 790 pages of eventually-to-be-released goodness currently in editing with Ken Hite. 

For now, though – I hope that you enjoy the adventure, and spread the word so that we smash the funding goal and continue into the stretch goals!

Thursday is GURPSDay and September has come and gone. Hey, I even turned 46 this past Monday! (If you want to get me a present, throw a few bucks at my Kickstarter. If enough GURPS folks throw in, maybe some nice things can happen).

Also: Pretty sure exactly two years ago today I blew myself up, fracturing my heel into six pieces and in the process launching myself six to eight feet into my back yard.

Fortunately, while I failed my IQ roll, I did make my HT roll.

So: GURPSDay!

Welcome to the second year of GURPSDay, and here’s the pull for this week.

We’re currently drawing content from 89 blogs. Only 11 more to go until we’re pulling from 100! But we’ll need your help. And if you just started a GURPS blog – and I know that some of you have – email me and get on the list!

How? Two action items: post more, recruit more. It’s really that simple. More posters is more posts, and more interest in GURPS.

Below you can find the blog activity for the last week. There’s a whole lotta awesome GURPS going on. Read all the posts.

Not every blog posts about GURPS every week, but some are ridiculously prolific! The list is randomized, so different bloggers will be highlighted at the top of the post each week.

As always, if you’re interested in having your blog consolidated here, navigate over to The Instructions Page and drop me a line. Take special note of the RSS Settings Fix if you’re on WordPress.
Continue reading “GURPSDay Summary Sep 29 – Oct 5, 2017”

Last week I sat down with James Introcaso again, and spoke for more than an hour on grappling, Dungeon Grappling, how to publish a game, and how I approach running a Kickstarter, especially as a newbie.

It was a fun interview, and James is a great interlocutor.

Check it out!

TableTop Babble – 040 – 5e Sci Fi and Kickstarter Advice

Thursday is GURPSDay and September nearly past. We’re still seeing more and more of the Dungeon Fantasy RPG is arriving at folks’ homes if they’re in the USA, with pictures, gushing, and reviews proliferating. Some anecdotes for store-bought Kickstarter copies departing the shelves at a good clip.

Welcome to the second year of GURPSDay, and here’s the pull for this week.

We’re currently drawing content from 89 blogs. Only 11 more to go until we’re pulling from 100! But we’ll need your help. And if you just started a GURPS blog – and I know that some of you have – email me and get on the list!

How? Two action items: post more, recruit more. It’s really that simple. More posters is more posts, and more interest in GURPS.

Below you can find the blog activity for the last week. There’s a whole lotta awesome GURPS going on. Read all the posts.

Not every blog posts about GURPS every week, but some are ridiculously prolific! The list is randomized, so different bloggers will be highlighted at the top of the post each week.

As always, if you’re interested in having your blog consolidated here, navigate over to The Instructions Page and drop me a line. Take special note of the RSS Settings Fix if you’re on WordPress.
Continue reading “GURPSDay Summary Sep 22 – Sep 28, 2017”

Thursday is GURPSDay and September nearly past. We saw the release of another Pyramid (Monster Hunters III, Pyr 3/107), the Dungeon Fantasy RPG is arriving at folks’ homes if they’re in the USA, with pictures, gushing, and reviews proliferating.

Welcome to the second year of GURPSDay, and here’s the pull for this week.

We’re currently drawing content from 89 blogs. Only 11 more to go until we’re pulling from 100! But we’ll need your help.

How? Two action items: post more, recruit more. It’s really that simple. More posters is more posts, and more interest in GURPS.

Below you can find the blog activity for the last week. There’s a whole lotta awesome GURPS going on. Read all the posts.

Not every blog posts about GURPS every week, but some are ridiculously prolific! The list is randomized, so different bloggers will be highlighted at the top of the post each week.

As always, if you’re interested in having your blog consolidated here, navigate over to The Instructions Page and drop me a line. Take special note of the RSS Settings Fix if you’re on WordPress.
Continue reading “GURPSDay Summary Sep 15 – Sep 21, 2017”

As sometimes happens, a comment is too good to pass up and reply to in the comments section. Kallatari, who I believe knows of what he speaks, wrote in. His comments are in quote-blocks, and my responses or notes follow.

First, just wanted to say that what you’ve described is pretty much exactly how I’ve been gaming suppression fire in my games. The one exception is that I only did one attack to someone who entered the cone of fire, and not once per hex. I’ll be implementing that immediately.

That was a bit to keep things moving, keep the math to a minimum, and make each hex scary enough that it features as a deterrent in the player’s mind, since most times they’re not nearly as risk averse with their little paper men as they should be. Another way to go would simply be to figure out the transgressor’s “bullet exposure” and base RoF on that. But I really do like the per-hex method, because scary.

One thing I’ve wondered about, but never worried too much because it’s never really come up in my game, is what happens when the RoF divided by width gives an effective RoF that’s less than 1. It’s unlikely to occur when the target zone is centered on opponents at range. But, in a hypothetical situation, what if he made his cone 3 hexes wide 1 hex away (really desperate against that horde of zombies that just closed into melee range)? He’s basically covering a 180-degree cone, and the bullets that don’t hit would likely keep travelling quite a bit further away. So at 10 hexes away in this situation, the RoF is effectively a small fraction. Do we apply penalties to the effective skill of 6 (at which point, may as well declare an automatic miss). But what about the fright checks? I’ve now suppressed a 180-degree angle. Should there be a bonus based on the fraction (RoF of 1/2 = +2, RoF of 1/5 = +5?).

This seems as a good a judgement as any, and the two or three bullets per hex which norms to zero isn’t bad. I think that the usual cut-off for suppression fire is RoF 5 per hex, and since that gets a +1 for RoF in the usual rules and my alternate, using a lower RoF and having the shots be vs the minimum 5 or less wouldn’t be horrible. On the other hand . . .

Additionally, I’ve been starting to question why suppression fire is treated differently than any normal gunshots.

There is this. Technically, with the rules in Tactical Shooting how any near miss can induce a fright check, they’re not. At least for fear.

If I pick a single target and fire at his hex with Suppression Fire, I attack him with a maximum effective skill of (6 + 3 =) 9, even if my skill, say, 25. Even if I miss, he needs to make a Fright Check roll to not take cover. Finally, if any bullets miss, then I get to roll to hit anyone else who enters into the line of fire until my next turn.

On the other hand, if I pick that same target and fire 15 rounds directly at him then I get to attack with my skill of 25 + 3 = 28 (minus range penalty, etc.), which means a better chance to hit. But if I miss, he doesn’t have to make any Fright Check or bother to take cover. And if any bullets miss, I don’t get to attack anyone else who crosses the line of fire before my next turn.

I think there’s a case to be made for a few things here

(a) It’s important to hit the fear check for any missed shots. You might even say that the fear-check zone extends RoF bonus more hexes to the left and right of the area being fired into

(b) ANY use of RoF 5 or more creates a suppression line. For a direct-fire attack, that line is only one yard wide – a line, actually – but you get attacked as stray fire if you’re in the line when the bullets are fired, or with suppression fire if you cross that line later.

These are basically almost two identical scenarios with widely different game effects. I’ve therefore been contemplating – but haven’t yet implement – a rule where anyone in the line of fire of any gun shot (or laser beams, or lightning bolt spells, etc.) has to make a fright roll to not take cover, and that, if a bullet hasn’t hit a specified target, than there’s a “live fire” line of attack that anyone who crosses becomes a potential target. To me, All-Out Attack (Suppression Fire) just allows you to divide your shots over a wider area, reducing your chances of hitting in exchange for possibly affecting more people with fright checks.

Or what he just said. Yeah, this is fair if you can remember it . . .

My one hesitation is that it would possibly slow combat down in order to track all the lines/arcs of fire. But since I use MapTools for my combat, I don’t think it would be that complicated.

. . . and VTTs make it really easy. In fact, in Roll20 in the game described, that’s exactly what we did. Drew the cone of fire. We still had one guy run across it, but that was OK. It also makes the Teamwork or Standard Operating Procedure perks that much more useful, as I think one or both lets you cross suppression fire zones of your own team with relative impunity.