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As a Strange Dr once said: “We’re in the Endgame now.”

Oh: that may have been a spoiler.

In any case, I got the advance copies of Citadel and HoJ (2nd Edition) yesterday.

These are freakin’ gorgeous books. I’m super-proud of Citadel, and I hope you guys enjoy the heck out of it.

Enough back-patting: here are a few pictures.

All three books, in advance-copy form
All three books, in advance-copy form
Fantastic Dungeon Grappling, Citadel at Nordvorn,  Hall of Judgment (1e), and Hall of Judgment (2nd Edition) spine view
Fantastic Dungeon Grappling, Citadel at Nordvorn, Hall of Judgment (1e), and Hall of Judgment (2nd Edition) spine view
Map and Artist's Take on Longbru; Sewn binding visible.
Map and Artist’s Take on Longbru; Sewn binding visible.
Interior shot of Hall of Judgment 2e
Interior shot of Hall of Judgment 2e
Lay-flat binding!
Lay-flat binding!
Close-up of stitching. Should be robust.
Close-up of stitching. Should be robust.

And lastly, a parting shot of the two 128-page Norðlond books.

They should arrive in the UK maybe by the end of the week. I expect few shennanigans with getting them into the UK from Latvia, since books are 0% VAT and Latvia and the UK are easy relatively speaking. I’ve shipped bookmarks to Kixto from the US – I could not guarantee that the printer I had in the UK would produce product that would work with a dry-erase marker – and they should arrive June 18.

Shipping to international customers will be done within a few days after that; 1-8 weeks for delivery depending on the fortunes of shipping and travel.

Then the remainder of the books will be transported to Studio 2 in TN for fulfillment. Two weeks or less from arrival to books-in-hand.

Endgame.

Hey, while I’m finishing up the relationship map and the index (I took care of the monsters last night), let me distract you with some art and artists, in alphabetical order. I also use stock art by Dean Spencer, and his Patreon portfolio (and DriveThruRPG work) are a great aid to any RPG publisher.

Thomas Denmark

Thomas and I actually have a longer association than I thought, though this the first time he’s accepted an art commission from me. He and David Pulver featured a short grappling system for OSR games (that would eventually become Dungeon Grappling for That Other Game) in Thomas’ Guardians Superhero RPG. Turns out we both share a love for Viking/Norse lore and culture.

https://www.thomasdenmark.com/portfolio-samples

Ben Jan

Ben specializes in landscapes and environments, and does a spiffy job with both. He was lightning fast on the commission work.

https://www.artstation.com/winterkeep

Ksenia Kozhevnikova

Ksenia has a wide repertoire of styles to choose from, and I loved the sensibilities she brought to the work.

http://kseniakoz.com/portfolio/illustration-portfolio/

Juan Ochoa

Juan and I have been working together since my first Kickstarter, Dungeon Grappling. In fact, we worked together before any kickstarters were launched, as I commissioned him to do pre-visualization on Dragon Heresy. He’s done two different covers for me, plus some neat other work.

http://www.juanochoa.co/

Glynn Seal

Known best for his Midderlands OSR setting and that he won a Gold Medal ENnie for Cartography last year, I’ve used him for both of my Dungeon Fantasy RPG projects for cartography. I love the style and detail he puts in to the maps.

https://monkeyblooddesign.co.uk/cartography/

Ricardo Troula

Rick did the cover work for Citadel, so you’ve been seeing his stuff from the get-go. But he’s also got some great work inside the book as well, such as this more pastoral scene.

http://ricktroula.com/

Kriz Villacis

Finally, Kriz – another who’s been working with me since the beginning.

https://www.artstation.com/krizevil

Citadel At Nordvorn: Final Tally

When all was said and done, when the campaign ended on March 24, we’d done very, very well. 200% funding, a new-record 600 backers, and also a new-record (for me) $26,000.

Officially my best campaign ever.
We hit the goals for 128 pages, and a high-quality offset print run with a sewn, lay-flat binding. So it’s going to be

Miss the Campaign?

Pre-orders are Open

If you missed the campaign, or chose to wait until it was certain to fund, it’s not too late to jump in.

After some mis-steps with shipping, we got it figured out. I’m doing a print run of CitadelHall of Judgment, and the new Fantastic Dungeon Grappling in Latvia.

That means for international backers, shipping will come out of the UK, at a greatly-reduced price relative to out-of-the-USA shipping. So if you held off physical product because of usually-egregious shipping fees, you might want to check things out.

The book is looking to be very pretty. The interior art is coming in, with five or six finished pieces and a whole lot more underway: 42 commissioned pieces of art for the book, plus some stock art from the always-amazing Dean Spencer where it made sense.

The text of the book – with one exception – has been written and edited and inserted into the layout. There is one page of text I need to finish up – that’s on tap for today, actually – then to build the relationship map of characters and motivations that will help GMs navigate likely responses to events. I’ll be testing that out at FNORDCon.

FNORDCon?

Yep! I’ll be headed down to Austin, TX this weekend to run Hall of Judgmentand Citadel one time each. My author Kyle Norton will be running the never-before-seen scenario The Dragons of Rosgarth as a playtest. That is the next adventure in the Nordlond series. If you’re there, try and check it out. He’s running it twice.

What’s next?

As Citadel finishes up, with hardly a breath Gaming Ballistic will turn from the Dungeon Fantasy RPG to The Fantasy Trip. The Kickstarter for the first four of a planned 10-or-more set of adventures for TFT will be launching in May.

In fact, pretty much the week after I send out the preliminary PDF to Backers, I’ll be generating the KS campaign sheet for TFT. The adventures themselves are already written! Four adventures, two each by David Pulver and the team of Christopher Rice and J. Edward Tremlett (both published TFT authors), which will release as four separately-packaged 16-page short scenarios.

Each will feature a color cover, black-and-white interior to better fit with the overall aesthetic of the TFT game line, and as much pretty art as I can cram in there. The TFT fans have let it be known that hex counters for all monsters had better appear either in the game or as an add-on, so I’ll make sure that happens.

That should Kickstart in late April or early May (in all honesty, probably early May), and run through May. Art an assembly should go quickly since the words are already done, so I’m hoping to have PDFs to backers by mid to late June. Printing will be rather later, depending on volume. I’ve got great ideas on how to bring this to fruition efficiently.

Is that All?

Actually, no. Following TFT, The Dragons of Rosgarth will get its day, another adventure for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG. Then Forest’s End, the third planned Dungeon Fantasy RPG adventure for 2019.

And after that, four more TFT scenarios!

Surely that’s all?

Nope. There are a few other things in the works that I’m not ready to talk about yet, but one of them I am. I’ve partnered with James Spahn, author of White Star, for a short Swords & Wizardry scenario set in a fantasy-Viking culture. It will be 16-pages long, full color, and should convert nicely to Dragon Heresyand the Dungeon Fantasy RPG. Look for that at the end of the year!

It’s shaping up to be an amazing, exhausting, thrilling year for Gaming Ballistic. I hope you all join me for the ride.

Disclaimer: I’m a terrible artist

This may be a mistake, but I’m willing to show you guys my crappy whiteboard art direction for the Citadel at Norðvorn Kickstarter  if you promise me not to flee in terror.

I’ve tried to make some references for my artists, as well as things to keep my writing consistent. So, when I say “this is a setting,” what I mean is that I have in mind some of the lovely and inspirational detail in worlds like Harn, which I experienced with Rob Conley playing in his game.

Nordvorn and the Lower Town

This was my initial sketch of the citadel. I wanted it to be very not-square, something that marks it as a dwarf-hewn keep. I also wanted it big – one of the most impressive castles and structures. I tended to look up “how big was a castle wall/tower/keep,” find the biggest one, and then make this bigger. For example, the Great Wall of China is about 5m wide and 8m tall. Audreyn’s Wall is thus 10m x 10m, but not exactly square.

In any case, this was my initial reference for the Citadel, which led naturally to thinking about Laegribaer, the Lower Town.

What the heck is an aircraft carrier doing there? Scale. It’s a gigantic ship, 330m or so long (1,000-ish feet) and shows that the inner courtyard contains nearly six acres of space. That’s a big inner bailey!

The river is the wrong scale, which I realized when thinking about how wide and deep the river is downstream at Ainferill (Riverbend). Nearly all of the water that flows there also flows here, so if the river is nearly 0.75 miles wide there . . . well, the gorge needs to be bigger. Probably 100-135m wide!

Looking at the Citadel allowed me to consider the shape of the town as well, I went with a classic Viking-style ring town, with an outer wall.

I went with concentric and spoke roads, and wooden towers interspersed between heavy, large, barbican-style gates. The River Gate was initially smaller, then it was enlarged and replaced as the town grew; the old gatehouse is still there, and a sprawling market exists on both sides of the outer wooden wall.

I’ve also worked out where the major “where do I shop” things happen here in the Lower Town, and that gets a solid section in the writeup. Remember, though: Norðvorn is a city, but not Town – adventure can and should happen here!

If it’s time to rest your head, where do you go? A bit of research led me to believe that when focusing on the traditional “fantasy Inn,” I was vastly underscoping how much money and importance these places were. Matt Riggsby probably already knew all this, but it was new to me! So I made sure each of the major Inns had its own thing going on, and that the owners had their own quirks and character, and ties to the workings of the town. Also: for those that want to do so, under the inns there was usually storage for valuables for travelers, and while in Nordvorn in particular, a dungeon might be out of place . . . it might not.

But what if you can’t afford the inn? What if you don’t want to stay there?

Gestrisni – An Excerpt from the Book

Gestrisni. Afer the fall of the dragon empire, the subjugated populations—humans, eldhuð, captured elves and half-elves, and others—fled south out of the Dragonground, with hordes of dragon-men, eðlafolk, and gangaeðla in pursuit. Those caught might be re-enslaved, or killed and eaten. Settlements and fortifications were hastily erected, and a custom grew of allowing any traveler to take refuge inside a compound. The words for “traveler” and “refugee/fugitive” in the Norðlond language differ only slightly, with “moving from one place to another” and “fleeing being turned into an hors d’oeuvre” being relegated to context and aspiration of certain letters. In any case, a long tradition of guest-right (gestrisni, or hospitality) in others’ homes took root over time. Gestrisni is not a trifling thing—by requesting it, one is stating that the host has something you need: protection.

The host provides shelter; the guest promises to stand fast in the home’s defense. In more modern times, with Nordlond being somewhat more civilized (depending on whom you ask, of course), gestrisni is usually requested or offered within those of a common background and social status. A party led by a follower of The Snow Queen of no special wealth or nobility might reasonably request gestrisni of a shopkeeper or successful farmer from within the braeðralag of the Snow Queen. A husgjof (house-gif) of food, drink, or some tangible useful object is usually offered each night. In practice, this is the cost of living for your Wealth level, though it is never paid in coin, as that would be insulting to the host.

Back to Images

To help my artists visualize the area, I attacked my whiteboard and came up with some, well, not-so-great perspective drawings of the keep itself. It dominates the local scenery, and I wanted to ensure folks were working from a common base.

I first tried to capture the bulk of the fortress. Squat and imposing, I hoped. The scale isn’t great on this, mostly that the walls are thicker in cross-section than shown. If I had time and a 3D modeling program, I’d be able to do this easily.

Connecting the keep to the Lower Town across the river gorge – which I realized as I worked had to be MUCH wider (and the river MUCH deeper!) than I’d initially conceived it – is the Eternal Bridge. It actually anchors into the wall of the keep side, perhaps 30m below the magically-raised location of the Citadel on the north side of the gorge. Counter-weighted lifts bring goods and travelers from the lower docks, and the winding and defensible stairway, called The Spiral, takes you from the gates in the gorge up to inside the keep itself.

The smaller keep on the Laegribaer side of the fortress is called Little Rock, and it would be considered a primary and impressive fortification all by itself were it not dwarfed (see what I did there?) by the Citadel itself!

On either side of the gorge, cut into the rock and supported with good engineering, magic, and pillars, are the lower docks. Giant stone and wooden dockworks and huge, counter-weighted lifts bring cargo from the river level up to the main market. The lift ends at the foot of a road that leads to the outer wall, which is formally called the Lift Road, but locals tend to call it Tax Street.

That’s probably enough, though I do have more that I gave my artists.

But if you really want to know where the money’s going on The Citadel at Norðvorn: it’s here. Taking my crude visualizations and power-point doodles and turning them into high-quality artwork and maps for you to use.

Citadel at Nordvorn is currently on Kickstarter, and more than halfway to the funding goal. If the above strikes your interest, please consider pledging! Most of the book will be system neutral, and applicable to any fantasy RPG.

Return to Norðlond with a mini-setting by Gaming Ballistic.

Response to the first journey to Norðlond, to find the Hall of Judgment, was outstanding, and introduced players of the Dungeon Fantasy RPG to Isfjall, a city in the depths of the barbarian north. Now, journey from Isfjall to Norðvorn, the magnificent castle and town that anchors both Audreyn’s Wall and The Palisade.

The Citadel at Norðvorn is coming to Kickstarter on February 19

From the northeast, the dragonkin threaten; from the northwest, the Hunted Lands are simmering, and about to boil over with hostile faerie. And of course the peoples of Norðlond are troubled by scheming, demons, and schemin’ demons.

Citadel will contain three large settlements: Norðvorn itself, home to 7,500 residents including the Castellan and the Wardens. Longbru, opposite one of the sallyports in Audreyn’s Wall, a town from which many adventurerers depart into the Dragongrounds . . . but not all return. And Ainferill, a town in turmoil after the tragic “accidental” death of the Jarl’s wife and adult son. It also spends some time to talk about what is between the big settlements: details on some sample villages, many important NPCs and what they care about, and a tangled web of danger and deceit that the PCs can engage with, or not, as they choose.

Citadel is a mini-setting for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG, again licensed by Steve Jackson Games to Gaming Ballistic. It will contain the locations above, plus important and not-so-important people and factions, each with their own goals. The entire region is about to burst into chaos . . . can the PCs find out why, and help contain the coming dark?

Citadel is planned for 80 pages, but I probably have enough content for 128 page or even 144 if things go very well. Stretch goals will add content in 16 page increments, improve the quantity and quality of art. As before, the book will be softcover and in 8×10″ format. If you liked Hall of Judgment, this book’s production values will be at least as good.

I hope you will join me, as before, in spreading the word and helping this come to life.

I managed to get my “year in review” out on January 1, which is really quick for a year in review. Now, even more importantly, it’s time to look forward. While “do more with the games I have” is in the cards, publishing and growing my business is about new content. So without further ado, here’s my tentative publishing and crowdfunding schedule for 2019.

On the Docket

There are certain things that are either contracted or have already an agreement in place but signatures pending. What are those? Some you know, some you don’t.

I did announce this in various channels, but Steve Jackson Games and Gaming Ballistic struck a deal similar to the one we made on the Dungeon Fantasy RPG, allowing me to produce 3rd-Party content under license for The Fantasy Trip. The TFT projects are up to 10 short adventures, which will be a color cover, black and white interior, and 16 pages long each. It would be insane to crowdfund one of these each month, and they can be produced reasonably quickly, so I’ll do them in batches of 4. If the first two campaigns do well, I’ll solicit for more authors for more projects. I’d love to effectively get far enough along on these, and have them be popular enough, to release one per month until SJG and the buying public get tired of them.

Additionally, I’m very excited about the new Dungeon Fantasy RPG projects. Nordvorn is the one I’m writing now, and I’ve now pretty much cleared my plate of everything but finishing the draft. When it’s close enough to done that I don’t feel like I’m in a panic, I’ll launch a Kickstarter, but I really want that to be in February, which means I’ve got about two weeks to polish up the draft. Given that I’ve already written 42,000 words and I don’t think the market will bear a book larger than about 80-112 pages, this means anywhere between zero and 17,000 words in about two weeks, which is completely doable.

The other two Dungeon Fantasy RPG projects and all of the TFT ones aren’t being written by me as author. I’ll manage the projects, get art, edit, and do other publisher-type things. I’ve got nice contracts in place for all of these, including a feature where the pay scale rises for the authors as the number of backers increases. I hope they max out!

In any case, I’ll release more tidbits as I can. The “Print Available” line assumes a no-time-lost turn on an offset print run. If the demand isn’t sufficient to print the titles offset, then print availability will be a month to six weeks sooner, as digital short-run printing is faster but more expensive. Any offset runs will see books go into stores beside the core books, though, so I’m very excited about that. I hope that folks join me in making that possible.

Let’s do a table.

Project Working Title Book Title/Working Title Crowdfund Date Backer PDFs Print Available
Lost Hall 2e Lost Hall of Tyr (2nd Edition) Jan-19 Jun-19
Citadel The Citadel at Nordvorn Feb-19 May-19 Aug-19
TFT Group 1 Untitled TFT 1 Apr-19 Jun-19 Sep-19
Untitled TFT 2 Apr-19 Jun-19 Oct-19
Untitled TFT 3 Apr-19 Jun-19 Nov-19
Untitled TFT 4 Apr-19 Jun-19 Dec-19
Dungeon Fantasy RPG 2 Ruins Project Jun-19 Aug-19 Nov-19
Dungeon Fantasy RPG 3 Forest’s End Aug-19 Oct-19 Jan-20
TFT Group 2 Untitled TFT 5 Oct-19 Dec-19 Mar-20
Untitled TFT 6 Oct-19 Dec-19 Apr-20
Untitled TFT 7 Oct-19 Dec-19 May-20
Untitled TFT 8 Oct-19 Dec-19 Jun-20

A Deep Breath

This represents a very aggressive schedule for a one-man shop plus contractors. If Citadel and the first TFT crowdfunding go as well as I hope they go (without being irrationally exuberant!), though, it means that there will be a stream of funds available from sales of those books that I can get a head start on the rest, and that turns an aggressive schedule from one of stress to merely one of project management and risk assessment.

I’m good at that. Five for five Kickstarters on time, or even early to promised schedule.

Also, the Print Available release schedule is geared towards “not the kickstarter.” I suspect backers will get their print stuff all on the first date, but if there’s a retail release, it’ll follow the stepwise schedule so folks can see something new from me each month on the store shelves.

Even so, if these projects take flight at all, and Nordvorn and its children do as well as Hall of Judgment, and if the TFT content is half as well received as the TFT Adventures project, it will give a great start on getting the next ones going, and if they achieve the same success that the TFT Adventures do, the line becomes self-sustaining.

We’ll see.

That represents my intent. Real life and the slings and arrows of the real world may conspire to move things around . . . but this is what I’m aiming for. Five crowd-funding projects this year, each effectively launching when the PDFs go out for the one before. Once that happens, the printing is somewhat on autopilot – barring disasters and lost shipping containers, that’s just time. My printing partners of choice are top-notch, so I’m not worried on that score.

Is that “all” for 2019? Maybe, maybe not. I suspect so.

I think I’ll be quite busy enough!

 

The next installment in the licensed adventures for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG is starting to really come together. Look for The Citadel at Nordvorn soon! I’ve got over 42,000 words written so far, and in super-dense text format (no art, only the barest of layout, and a very temporary background) I’m at 650 words per page and 66 pages. The usual with-art layout is 500-550 words per page, which means the final document would be something like 78-86 pages were it done.

Which it’s not.

A Mini-Setting for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG

In Hall of Judgment, I set up Isfjall as “Town,” where you buy and sell your stuff, and it served as a jumping-off point for the quest to find the titular Hall.

Nordvorn is going to be a bit different. Yes, there’s Town. And nice GMs will tell the players which that is. But there are many other potential settlements to explore, and all of those are very much not Town.

There will of course be monsters to fight, ruins to explore, and bandits to kill and take their stuff. There will also be a tapestry of personalities and culture to play in, and if you liked what you got with Isfjall for Hall of Judgment, well, you’re going to get a whole lot more of it with the Citadel at Nordvorn.

Bear in mind that everything about the presentation of this will probably change. The image is just a simple background of a castle done up in Photoshop; the real background and graphic design will be similar enough to Hall of Judgment that you will know they’re related, but different enough to set it apart.

But it’s much easier for me to pick apart words on a page than it is to stare at a screen, so I dumped it into layout and now I can see what’s going on.

Nordvorn Itself

Nordvorn itself, both the Citadel and Laegribaer, the lower town. I cannot wait to get an artist to detail this up. I’ve got a really crude sketch of the city and town in, well, PowerPoint.

I’ve also got notes on what braethralag (brotherhoods devoted to the same god) cluster where, temples, craft districts, etc. Note that the Citadel is not necessarily “Town,” and that betrayals, violence, and things that aren’t rest, study, and buying and selling stuff can happen there!

There are five inns in the city, and each is located and described. There’s a fun section on shopping (and shipping, for that matter), of course. Plus even more festivals, some familiar, some new:

Geitur Dag (October). A festival peculiar to Norðvörn—and peculiar in general, really—Goat Day. Each year, the Lower Town goes absolutely mad for goats. Goat costumes, fermented goat milk, goat races, head-butting competitions, and the animal husbandry competition to see which pair of goats will be dubbed Tanngrisnir and Tanngnjóstr (the goats that pull the Thunder God’s chariot) for the day. Alas for the winners, at the end of the day, they get eaten by the Hamar and Steðji of the Thunder God’s temple.

More than One Town

Two neighboring towns, one of which very much is “Town.” The other is Ainferill, and there’s . . . a lot going on there. Little of it good. Violence, betrayal, cult activity, and a tangled web of intrigue. Plus folks to kill and stuff to take. Good times.

This is a piece I commissioned a long time ago for Dragon Heresy . . . but from the moment I set it down, I knew it was going to be one of the plot points in Citadel at Nordvorn.

There’s also Longbru, which is home to a dwarf-made bridge that spans the Jotunnain river for over a mile (thus: Long Bridge), and the opposite end terminates at one of the few sallyports in Audreyn’s Wall. Naturally, Longbru hosts many adventures seeking glory in the Endalaus Forest . . . and can be considered “Town” as per Exploits!

Coming Soon

With the relationship web already written, and the nouns coming together (Places, People, Things), I’m hoping to get to the point where I feel comfortable launching a project in a few weeks. That will be the first of three Dungeon Fantasy RPG projects, all set in Nordlond, and all planned for PDF delivery, if not print, in 2019. I’ve got some finalization to do on another project first, but when that’s done, it’s all Citadel, all the time when it comes to writing.

Unlike many of my prior projects for the last bit of time, though, Nordvorn is going to feature virtually zero re-used art from prior books, unless it’s absolutely on point. So you’ll get to see the graphic design and maps and imagery take shape more or less at the same time as I do.

Stay tuned! I hope you will have as much fun exploring this, which is the beginning of an extended look at Nordlond, as I am having writing it.

There’s a lot going on here at Gaming Ballistic, and eight days into the New Year I find myself multitasking furiously. This is good. One of the things I’m working on is setting up international print-on-demand for Hall of Judgment.

One of the eternal frustrations of working as a US publisher is the difficulty – largely due to shipping – of serving cross-border customers. For whatever reason (and I’ve read several), it’s darn near prohibitively expensive to get books made in the USA out. This is especially irksome given that if for some reason I am able to afford an offset print run, which brings the cost per book down to levels that can survive a distribution channel profitably . . . I can’t effectively get the books OUT again.

Anyway, short version here. I really liked the production values of Hall of Judgment. It wasn’t sewn or lay-flat, but it was a nice perfect-bound book on 93# paper (140gsm).

I just approved the new cover for Hall of Judgment via Print-on-Demand from the same vendor (CPI Anthony Rowe). It’s going to be about 1mm thinner, but still printed on nice thick silk-coated paper stock. It’s also going to be print-on-demand out of the UK, and sent by Royal Mail. This is the best shipping arrangement I’ve found.

So if you order a book from me and you’re not in the USA, it’ll probably come from them, and we can avoid the extra $20-40 in shipping that comes when I send out of the USA.

Once it’s all finalized, I just received word that the title is now ready to print! As soon as I get an update on prices, I’ll change the shipping prices on my website for that product. But it’s a good step to getting product worldwide for less.

I am making slow but steady process on The Citadel at Nordvorn, my first of three upcoming supplements for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG. It’s set in the same world as Hall of Judgment, but will easily be portable to any other game world with the right tweakage. I can see Nordvorn as it takes shape, and each area of the Lower Town, and the interesting places the PCs can visit, is plunking down on the map with ever-increasing certainty.

Citadel is not an adventure, as such. It is a web of locations and interactions, in which the players can find adventure. So it’s more of a mini-setting.

But it is, by far, the most detailed and specific thing I’ve done. Not “detailed rules,” because it’s not that sort of supplement. But the GM and players will know/can find out where to find all sorts of stuff. I was impressed when Rob Conley had all the rich descriptions of what shops and trades we were walking by in his Harn-inspired city that we played in way back when.

I think Nordvorn will be like that. I’m really looking forward to the maps.

Lost Hall of Tyr is coming to Dragon Heresy

In a few days, I’ll launch the Kickstarter for Lost Hall of Tyr (2nd Edition).

This is a somewhat unusual crowdfunding effort, in that there are really only two or three things I’m trying to do here. The order of the funding goals for the campaign changed while I was thinking about it, in order to maximize success and deliver the best product folks want.

  1. Upgrade the digital/stock asset combat maps with Glynn Seal’s stylistically great pen-and-ink drawings
  2. Upgrade from POD to high-quality digital printing
  3. A large-scale, softcover print run from an offset printer
  4. If possible, a large-scale hardcover print run so the books match the Dragon Heresy core book

In short, the purpose of the campaign is to make a spectacular print run, worthy of the Dragon Heresy Introductory Set‘s production values. And provide a companion module to sit on the shelf on stores next to the Dragon Heresy core book.

Why a Second Edition

Quite simply, the expansion of Lost Hall 1e into the Dungeon Fantasy RPG version “Hall of Judgment” made the book better in every way. Art. Maps. Setting details. The publication and distribution of Dragon Heresy meant that I had a great core book out there with no support. Lost Hall 1e made for a great convention scenario but not a great long-term campaign.

So I’m reformatting the new content for the 8.5×11″ form factor of Dragon Heresy, and revising it for the Dragon Heresy rules.

Got the Lost Hall PDF already?

If you have already purchased the Lost Hall of Tyr 1st Edition PDF, you’ll be getting a copy of the new edition for free. If you got it on DriveThru, you’ll likely get a link on DriveThru. If you bought it from my website, you’ll get a link from there, or an email.

This crowdfunding effort is only for the print copy. It’s going to be a great looking book, especially in hardcover. I’ve selected 105#/157gsm matte-coated art paper for the interior, and 2.5mm boards. The overall 112-page book will likely thus be about a half-inch thick, and will in all cases have either a lay-flat and smyth-sewn binding.

The book will also have a new cover – and a first-pass of it can be seen to the right. Juan wasn’t entirely happy with it, though, so it’ll be revised during the Kickstarter to make it even better.

June? Really?

I’m allowing lots of time in case we actually hit the stretch goals to do the maps and hit the offset print run. That’s really it. I hope to have it sooner than June, but Dragon Heresy took a long time to get done. The results were worth it, but they were time consuming.

This is the intended schedule. 
  • December 2018: Kickstarter campaign
  • January 2019: Funds settle, Backerkit phase; prelim PDF distribution for error proofing; new maps worked
  • Feb 2019: PDF finalization and print order submission; final PDF distribution
  • March-May 2019: Print overseas; transit to warehouse; fulfillment
  • June 2019: Delivery of hardcopy product to backers 

Retail and Bulk Order

The top tier is four copies each of Dragon Heresy and the new Lost Hall of Tyr. This is designed for stores, but thinking about it . . . if you want lots of them, you can have lots of them. I’m not closing this off from personal purchases: if you’re a store? Great. Please let me know! If you’re a person and you want to buy a bunch of them for whatever reason? Awesome.

Please Support Gaming Ballistic

I’ve got big plans for 2019, and Lost Hall 2e is the first of four products I hope to release supporting the Dragon Heresy line. Three of those four are being written right now, and two of them are from “not me,” which means other authors are stepping up to the plate. Support for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG will continue as well, with each adventure being available in two versions (not dual-statted), with an appropriate form factor for each line: 8×10 softcover for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG, and (ideally, with your support), 8.5×11 hardcover for Dragon Heresy.

Please help spread the word, let your local gaming stores know about Dragon Heresy and this Kickstarter, and with your help, 2019 is only the beginning.

The Kickstarter Preview is Now Live!