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Good morning! As we head into the weekend, we’re just a hair short of 80% funding. For what they’re worth, projects put us just shy of the top stretch goal, which suggests we’ll handily make the offset print goal. Of course, it’s all speculation until it actually happens. As always, a tweet, a blog post, a reshare of the link help quite a bit to expand the project’s reach.

I thought I’d lead into the weekend by teasing the content of the 16-page Norðlondr Fólk book.

Norðlondr Fólk

Each entry features a template, of course (Traits), plus special traits specific to the template (Special Traits). Additionally, there are unique “grow into them” gifts for every race to spend surplus or (in most cases) earned points on.

So what’s in the book?

Familiar Faces

  • BOX Racial Gifts
  • Cat-Folk
  • Dwarves
  •      Dvergr (a Norðlond-specific description and traits better fitting with the implied history of the setting)
  • Elves
  •      Elfàrd (a Norðlond-specific description and traits better fitting with the implied history of the setting)
  • Gnomes
  • Half-Elves
  •      Hálfálfar (a Norðlond-specific description and traits better fitting with the implied history of the setting)
  • Half-Ogres & Half-Orcs (orcs and ogres need some tweaks to fit in with the setting history; their niches are usually filled in Norðlond by trolls and storalfar/hobs, respectively)
  • Halflings
  •      Neveri Halfling (the Neveri are the thorn in the side of the southern border of Norðlond, perhaps 400 miles south of Audreyn’s Wall. Nomadic tribes with the analogy to the Algar horse-lords, the Dothraki, or the Mongol hordes of the Khans. Some of the tribes are halflings, and they are not nice.)
  • BOX Downsizing (Kromm-approved optional guidance for tweaking out armor for little races like halflings and gnomes)

Beast-Folk

Some of these beast-folk are the results of purposeful rituals to bring a person closer to the totem or favored animal of one of the Gods, such as the Allfather’s Ravens, or putting the bear in bear-shirted (berserker). Some of them, well, “a wizard did it.”

  • CC Björnhjarta (Bear-Folk)
  • CC Gullinálmur (Boar-Folk)
  • BOX Becoming the Beast
  • CC Úlfblóðugur (Wolf-Blooded)
  • CC Hrafnar (Raven-Folk)
  • CC Triger-Folk

Half-Breeds

  • Dragon-Blooded
  • Eldhuð (Demon-Blooded)
  • Himneskur (God-Blooded)
  • Vandræðagemsi (Fae Gnomes)

We have 15 pages to fill, and I’m fairly sure we’ll also have room for elemental-touched half-breeds (four of them). I’m not listing them here yet; we’ll either see them if we have room, or we won’t, because the book is so filled with awesome already that we don’t need them.

Hopefully you like what you see. I know my previews of Kevin’s work have been really fun to read.

I’m going to try and keep this short and disgruntled.

I’ve got Drop Caps that I’m using for ID’ing part of a new adventure. I have asked, and the author complied, that all of the room numbers for a programmed adventure have three digits in them. I used a Paragraph Style and set the first three letters in the style to drop cap by three lines.

That gave me this, which was unacceptably tight. Ignore the crap font for now; I wanted the numbers to stand out, and tried the same font as the title. It doesn’t work; not readable enough. But the different font will be important later. For the record, it’s called “Rebuffed.”

Next, I treid a bunch of other things, including what was most-recommended on the net, setting a linked Character Style to higher Kerning. A LOT higher. That not only spaced out the drop-cap, but it made the character spacing unacceptably wide for the room numbers. So no joy there.

I tried something else, and while I got good spacing, it inexplicably dropped the room number. I still have no idea what caused this. At all.

Finally, I found that if I manually first deleted, and then inserted a single space between the large number and the following text, I could highlight that space and adjust the Kerning of just that space. That works.

Great, I have 193 room numbers. I don’t wish to do this 193 times. Fortunately, with GREP I don’t have to.

  • Go into Find.
  • Use the GREP part of Find (click on it).
  • Find any three digits (\d\d\d) or (/d/d/d) I can’t remember at the moment, and use “find format” to select the Rebuffed font.
  • In Replace, use $0_ ($0 is “found string” and the underscore is a space), and set the Kerning to what you want. In my case, it was 200. If you need more, you can get more, manually.
  • Change all. Oh, look . . . 193 changes made. Wooticus.
  • THEN, go back to GREP. Don’t change the “find” because you still want those same three characters. Delete the space in the Replace box.
  • Then change the Kerning formatting back to zero.
  • Change all. 193 changes made, and now there’s a space after the three-digit Drop Cap with the proper Kerning. And it looks like this.

So all is right with the world for now.

There are a LOT of tricks to do fun things with a single drop-cap letter. Fewer that I could find with a drop-cap string of things. A lot of the “fixes,” which will 100% work, are to take your drop-cap target and cut it out, then paste it back as an anchored object. This is a pain in the rear to do 193 times, but the formatting choices you will have are much larger, as you can use the very robust Text Wrap features to control formatting. In fact, what I’d appreciate in InDesign quite a bit would be if the Drop Cap function did exactly that: it pulled each targeted letter out of its string and pasted it in as an anchored object with the proper settings automatically, creating a Paragraph Style and Character Style called (say) Drop Cap Style 1 and Drop Cap Character Style 1. That way you can independently format the drop-cap and the following text more easily. You can still do it, but one must be careful, or you get the weird behavior in my middle example without changing any of the settings. I mean, I’m sure what’s happening is my fault; the computer is just following instructions. But something changes and it’s not always something I know how to fix.

Anyway, that’s my “struggling mightily with InDesign” layout lesson for today. Hopefully it’s useful to someone.

 

It’s been a bit since I provided an update, so here we go.

At the high level, the Four (Five!) Perilous Journeys Kickstarter is chugging along, on budget, on schedule, and making progress. Backerkit is moving along, pre-orders are a bit light, and the art that’s coming in is really blowing my socks off.

Shipping

International shipping still scares the pants off me. That being said, I have made a few adjustments I wanted to cover (again, really: I mentioned it in a prior update).

If you’re shipping game accessories to Canada, instead of having the orders ship from the UK, they’ll ship from the US. This avoids weird questions with taxes and VAT from the UK side and saves Canucks a few bucks.

If you’re shipping books only, which are not taxed, they’ll still come from the UK.

Otherwise, I sent the list of international shipments to my fulfillment partner and he pre-calculated what I was going to likely owe given where we were on things, and basically I’ve gotten the shipping essentially correct. I’m not hundreds or thousands of dollars over or under for the international shipping, which is what I was afraid of. Under because that would turn a successful project into a very painful one, and I don’t want to do that. Over because shipping is not supposed to be a profit center. If one includes the money it will take to get the accessories over to the UK in the first place . . . I may be within a few tens of dollars of “exactly right.” So booyah. That’s good and right.

Backerkit Progress, Funding, and Spending

We’re really doing very well. We’re well over 90% and have been for a bit, and have brought in as I type this about $8,600 in extra revenue, with 93% of backers having responded to the survey. In truth, about half of the 37 folks who haven’t yet responded aren’t receiving any products that are set to ship, so unless they wish to engage in a pledge adjustment or throw down some add-ons, they’ll get what they paid for.

It looks like we’re linearizing to about $9,000 to $9,100 in total extra funds, which means overall, the Kickstarter probably brought in close to $50K at the top line. That’s rather nice.

I’ve done a preliminary tally, and total revenue (less Kickstarter fees) will be around $45,000 – $9K from Backerkit and $36K from Kickstarter. I’ve paid a bunch of bills so far and I project having anywhere from $25-29K left to spend. That will leave me with actual profit for the campaign, plus the distribution sales that hopefully will come once the print versions go into retail stores.

So the trajectory is good, though of course in business there’s always room to screw things up.

Pre-Orders thus far are pretty light. Hopefully folks will see this update who missed the Kickstarter and jump in.

Covers

Mostly you’ve seen these, I think. But three of the five covers are basically finished.

I’m working with my artists on the last two covers; I will likely tweak each one out a bit more to ensure maximum readability and uniformity of presentation: logo sizes and position, etc.

Interior

I’m starting to see interior art come in, but that’s a bit of the long pole in the tent. One of the long poles.

The art here is by Ben Jan, who also did the covers of Crown (this book) and Curse. I’ve engaged Sandrine Malus to balance out a few more pieces in Crown, which will effectively finish the book save for title page credits, playtester credits, ISBN, and some map tweaks.

Citadel of Ice will have the interior art done last…but see below for progress on the counters.

Pirate King has been commissioned and is being worked; I need to get in touch with the artist for Ironskull, which though the first finished is the last to be worked from an art perspective.

Vampire Hunter Belladonna transitioned to the writing rather than outlining stage in the last week or so.

Counter Art

I got some updates from Rick (Citadel of Ice) on the die-cut color counter art. Holy wow.

I’ll just leave a few examples here, and then sign off. If you are inspired to jump in now, having missed the campaign . . . it’s not to late to pre-order.

“I can edit myself” is probably one of the biggest myths in writing. Fortunately, it’s not something I have deluded myself into thinking. I know I need an editor, and I’d like to introduce you to mine for the Citadel at Nordvorn: Emily Blain.

She came recommended to me through Smunchy Games. We chatted, and I asked her my most important question: “Where do you stand on the Oxford comma?”

She fired right back: “How many spaces do you put after a period?”

Asked and answered, and we knew we’d get along.

She did a quick test-edit of a few thousand words of the manuscript, and named her price. I told her that was unacceptable and doubled it. Good work is worth paying for.

In any case: Meet Emily!

Revised by Emily

Emily Blain is a detail-oriented perfectionist who gets way more annoyed than she should about errors in supposedly professional publications. She graduated from Luther College in 2012 with a liberal arts education, a music major, and an education minor. Since then, she has worked as an administrative assistant and Communications Director in addition to teaching private music lessons.

After moving and leaving her part-time job in spring 2018, Emily decided to combine two things she enjoys (proofreading and gaming) into one grand new business venture. While she originally planned for Revised by Emily to be a general proofreading business specializing in board games, she quickly realized that there were far more games being designed than there were editors/proofreaders available to analyze the rulebooks. She started “cold calling” designers, mostly via Facebook message at first, offering to look over and edit their games. Her first project was the Greek board game Theosis which successfully funded in July of 2018. This has blossomed into the first of multiple ongoing partnerships with various game companies.

Prior Work

Emily also works closely with Sky Relics Games. Sky Relics completed their first Kickstarter in January of 2018 and is inches from the finish line of getting the game out to backers. They are also working on their second game, Relic Hunters, a co-op dungeon crawl, and Emily is excited to be in on this one from the ground level. She took a prototype to Protospiel MN in January 2019 and got a little bit of experience on the design side of things! Despite feeling like her brain was full to bursting every night, Emily had an incredible time and loved getting to meet more designers and hear their perspectives on game making.

Emily’s newest long-term partnership is with Smunchy Games. Her first project was the novella, Paths: A War Drum of Death. When Sean, the author, told her it would be available at Barnes and Noble, she was more than a bit nervous and surprised, but it was a great experience and a project she’s very proud of. That collaboration expanded into the Paths RPG materials which will be coming to Kickstarter in April 2019.

In her free time (yes, despite multiple ongoing projects, she makes time for fun!), Emily enjoys playing both board and PC games with her husband and friends. Their current favorite tabletop games are Spirit Island and Aeon’s End: Legacy. She always relishes smashing all the things to bits with her Warhammer as Gurdis, her D&D 5e Dwarf Fighter. She’s also looking forward to the day when she can play more games than just “Go Away Monster” with her adorable two-year-old daughter!

https://www.revisedbyemily.com/
https://www.revisedbyemily.com/
Morning! As we head into what will be a heavy writing weekend for me on Citadel at Norðvorn, I wanted to leave you with two podcasts.

Roleplay Rescue (Che Webster)

Che and I talk for about an hour, and cover gaming stuff both old and new.

Game Night on Geek Gab

I return to their show for the third time. We cover what’s gone on at Gaming Ballistic since HoJ, being nice to customers, and group stealth rolls . . . plus a bunch of Nordvorn sporadically through the show.

I’ve updated the Lost Hall of Tyr (2nd Edition) PDF to correct some errors I noticed while looking at the proof. This should be the final file, though doubtlessly in the future someone will point out something I missed. This is the change log.

You should be receiving a Backerkit distribution of the file. I’m currently spooling out a new interior file for the printer(s), and that will be uploaded slightly later today. They actually prefer changes in the form of single page, but since both of the printers (UK and USA) also support POD, a new, full file is sensible.

Change Log u20190215

  • You’ll never notice this, because you’ll only get this version, but I’m upgrading the cover to 12pt/300gsm instead of 10pt/250gsm. The heavy paper on the interior needs an appropriately stout exterior.
  • p.iii – changed the ampersand in Swords & Wizardry to a different font, because it looked stupid in PR Viking
  • p. vi – adjusted the image and text to bring an orphan line where it belonged. It’s a hard-knock life.
  • p. 11 – Removed some underlines that were a legacy of the paragraph style used in the Pack Animals table
  • p. 18 – the borders went MIA in the Lowland Encounters table. They’re back.
  • p. 30 – a colon was used instead of a period in a run-in title. Colonectomy performed, period.
  • p. 41 – Way too many titles in the map-as-art. Now just reads “Dire Straits,” which gives more room for Dire Wolves to eat the PCs. Talk about clean plate club.
  • p. 42 – changed “When Norðalfar Attack” to “When Goblins Attack” in the art, and fixed a find/replace artifact (Goblinoids–>Goblins) in the text. A goblin is something different in the Dungeon Fantasy RPG, so my faerie goblins got renamed to norðalfs, plural/generic norðalfar.
  • p. 45 – removed an underline in the table that didn’t need to be there.
  • p. 49 – changed “ore” to “more” because typo, dammit.
  • p. 50 – expanded the map to very nearly fill the entire page. It’s slightly offset to the left in the PDF, because in print there will be paper lost to gutter.
  • p. 52 – Added details of “Trap D,” which managed to go MIA for several versions of the book. Yay, poison gas!
  • p. 54 – also expanded the map. This page was the bad print error page, so it would have been fixed regardless
  • p. 56 – Italicized Muspelheim.
  • p. 60 – changed paragraph style on “Varieties——>” to make it match other section heads
  • p. 92 – Changed map title to just read Dire Straits
  • p. 93 – Changed “Norðalfar” to “Goblins”
  • p. 102 – fixed a few layout errors and emphasis mistakes in the One Page Grappling section
  • p. 103 – fixed the ampersand in Swords & Wizardry so it doesn’t look silly
  • Back Cover – there are no ready-to-play characters in Lost Hall 2.0, because Dragon Heresy, 5e, and S&W Characters are very quick and simple to make at Level 1-5. That needed to be removed.

That’s the list!

The next installment in the licensed adventures for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG is starting to really come together. Look for The Citadel at Nordvorn soon! I’ve got over 42,000 words written so far, and in super-dense text format (no art, only the barest of layout, and a very temporary background) I’m at 650 words per page and 66 pages. The usual with-art layout is 500-550 words per page, which means the final document would be something like 78-86 pages were it done.

Which it’s not.

A Mini-Setting for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG

In Hall of Judgment, I set up Isfjall as “Town,” where you buy and sell your stuff, and it served as a jumping-off point for the quest to find the titular Hall.

Nordvorn is going to be a bit different. Yes, there’s Town. And nice GMs will tell the players which that is. But there are many other potential settlements to explore, and all of those are very much not Town.

There will of course be monsters to fight, ruins to explore, and bandits to kill and take their stuff. There will also be a tapestry of personalities and culture to play in, and if you liked what you got with Isfjall for Hall of Judgment, well, you’re going to get a whole lot more of it with the Citadel at Nordvorn.

Bear in mind that everything about the presentation of this will probably change. The image is just a simple background of a castle done up in Photoshop; the real background and graphic design will be similar enough to Hall of Judgment that you will know they’re related, but different enough to set it apart.

But it’s much easier for me to pick apart words on a page than it is to stare at a screen, so I dumped it into layout and now I can see what’s going on.

Nordvorn Itself

Nordvorn itself, both the Citadel and Laegribaer, the lower town. I cannot wait to get an artist to detail this up. I’ve got a really crude sketch of the city and town in, well, PowerPoint.

I’ve also got notes on what braethralag (brotherhoods devoted to the same god) cluster where, temples, craft districts, etc. Note that the Citadel is not necessarily “Town,” and that betrayals, violence, and things that aren’t rest, study, and buying and selling stuff can happen there!

There are five inns in the city, and each is located and described. There’s a fun section on shopping (and shipping, for that matter), of course. Plus even more festivals, some familiar, some new:

Geitur Dag (October). A festival peculiar to Norðvörn—and peculiar in general, really—Goat Day. Each year, the Lower Town goes absolutely mad for goats. Goat costumes, fermented goat milk, goat races, head-butting competitions, and the animal husbandry competition to see which pair of goats will be dubbed Tanngrisnir and Tanngnjóstr (the goats that pull the Thunder God’s chariot) for the day. Alas for the winners, at the end of the day, they get eaten by the Hamar and Steðji of the Thunder God’s temple.

More than One Town

Two neighboring towns, one of which very much is “Town.” The other is Ainferill, and there’s . . . a lot going on there. Little of it good. Violence, betrayal, cult activity, and a tangled web of intrigue. Plus folks to kill and stuff to take. Good times.

This is a piece I commissioned a long time ago for Dragon Heresy . . . but from the moment I set it down, I knew it was going to be one of the plot points in Citadel at Nordvorn.

There’s also Longbru, which is home to a dwarf-made bridge that spans the Jotunnain river for over a mile (thus: Long Bridge), and the opposite end terminates at one of the few sallyports in Audreyn’s Wall. Naturally, Longbru hosts many adventures seeking glory in the Endalaus Forest . . . and can be considered “Town” as per Exploits!

Coming Soon

With the relationship web already written, and the nouns coming together (Places, People, Things), I’m hoping to get to the point where I feel comfortable launching a project in a few weeks. That will be the first of three Dungeon Fantasy RPG projects, all set in Nordlond, and all planned for PDF delivery, if not print, in 2019. I’ve got some finalization to do on another project first, but when that’s done, it’s all Citadel, all the time when it comes to writing.

Unlike many of my prior projects for the last bit of time, though, Nordvorn is going to feature virtually zero re-used art from prior books, unless it’s absolutely on point. So you’ll get to see the graphic design and maps and imagery take shape more or less at the same time as I do.

Stay tuned! I hope you will have as much fun exploring this, which is the beginning of an extended look at Nordlond, as I am having writing it.

Convenient Aircraft Carrier for Scale.

I’m busily writing The Citadel at Nordvorn, Gaming Ballistic’s next return to the world of Nordlond (known as Torengar in Dragon Heresy). This one’s a mini-setting, focusing on the events and interactions between important players (including the characters!) in the lands surrounding this vital town. I am having ridiculous fun putting these towns together.

I just finished the description and detailing of Nordvorn itself. I am moving on to the other two important towns in the book, Ainferill (Riverbend) and Vegghofn (Sallyport).

The compact nature of the towns – Ainferill and it’s roughly 1,000 inhabitants sits on a chunk of land and water about 25 acres in size. That’s a circle about 350m in diameter, which is basically the size of The O2 (formerly the Millennium Dome) in England. That is, the entire village would fit inside it.

Even the much larger keep and town of Nordvorn is only 7,500 residents and its longest dimension is only three times that of Ainferill.

These are little places, relatively speaking, which means they can truly come alive with detail.

I certainly hope that you enjoy visiting them as much as I am writing them.

Excerpts

Some fun bits from the draft. Subject to change, of course. Presented entirely lacking context or structure.

Lyfta Road

The “lift road” is named for its terminus at the great lifts coming from the docks and the lower market and shipyard. After one leaves the market proper, one can find all sorts of ironmongery and shipfitting crafts: Sailmakers, blacksmiths, armorers, brassworkers, and weaponsmiths. The armorers and weapon-makers are closest to the Ring Road, mostly to reduce the noise. Any goods coming upstream, or going downstream, by ship must pass through the lift. As such, some call Lyfta Road “Skattgötu,” or “tax street.”

Eternal Bridge

A name like that invites hubris, but the Eilífur Brú has the chops to merit the name. The walls are over 20 feet thick, the columns, supports, and span magically melded with the strong rock of the river gorge. It has stood up to wind, weather, and thrown boulders from trolls and hill giants, as well as projectiles from siege engines.

The bridge begins with a massive structure known as The Terrace Gate, which as its name implies houses a series of massive doors each on a different level of the structure. The Terrace Gate actually enters a hundred feet or so below the top of the eastern gorge wall, and the winding staircase with interlocking gates, murder-holes, and other defensive emplacements is called The Spiral.

The town side of the Eternal Bridge ends in a large walled enclosure as well. There are barracks, training grounds, and defensive emplacements, and the entire structure would rank as one of the notable fortifications in Nordlond if it weren’t immediately adjacent to the Citadel itself.

The Hunting Gate

The closest tower and sallyport to Little Rock. Even more than the other city gates, the Hunting Gate is constructed to be used, and frequently, for war. It is staged to allow sorties from within the Lower Town when needed, as well as the point of departure for those thegns, huskarls, and Wardens who attempt to keep the people and goods coming out of the Hunted Lands safe. Or at least safer.

Sigurtákn

Thievery is forbidden. Sneaking around and taking someone else’s property is punishable by outlawry and thralldom. However, challenging someone to combat over a coveted possession, or facing them in some sort of fight, real or provoked, allows the victor vast leeway in claiming spoils of battle (in some cases this can include property and in older times, even family). Property obtained in this manner is called sigurtakn, (“victory token,” or “trophy”) and is considered honorable. Well, at least valorous. Dangerous, perhaps? A man bedecked head to toe in armor and weapons that are all sigurtakn is a man to be kept at arm’s length. Such people are called dýrð-óðir, or “glory-mad,” (behind their backs) and given the same sort of respect you give a scorpion, venomous snake, or feral dog – admiration for their deadliness, but not someone you turn your back on. Ever.

 

I am making slow but steady process on The Citadel at Nordvorn, my first of three upcoming supplements for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG. It’s set in the same world as Hall of Judgment, but will easily be portable to any other game world with the right tweakage. I can see Nordvorn as it takes shape, and each area of the Lower Town, and the interesting places the PCs can visit, is plunking down on the map with ever-increasing certainty.

Citadel is not an adventure, as such. It is a web of locations and interactions, in which the players can find adventure. So it’s more of a mini-setting.

But it is, by far, the most detailed and specific thing I’ve done. Not “detailed rules,” because it’s not that sort of supplement. But the GM and players will know/can find out where to find all sorts of stuff. I was impressed when Rob Conley had all the rich descriptions of what shops and trades we were walking by in his Harn-inspired city that we played in way back when.

I think Nordvorn will be like that. I’m really looking forward to the maps.

As seems to be frequently the case, when I’m in heavy writing mode there’s not much time for much else. The Citadel at Norðvörn needs wordcount!

Writing the Content

I’m trying to write an average of 1,500 words per day, which is non-trivial but I want to get this out there. I’m working from a healthy mind-map of the setting relationships, so it’s really a matter of picking one of the lines or dotted lines and expanding on each bit.

There are no pre-conceived outcomes here. Citadel is about a situation, and every group of PCs, along with the GM, will take this mini-setting and run with it.

The mind-map will be included in the adventure in some form or another, for easy reference. I was able to pretty much improv my way through a Dragon Heresy session with such a map, and with the creatures in the main DH book and those included in the adventure book if needed, plus the extensive guide to key personalities that’s going into the Citadel book, you can probably “just play.” That’s the goal, anyway.

Citadel, though, is the first of three planned Dungeon Fantasy RPG releases in 2019, so I want to get on it fast, so that my Inner Team can playtest it and see what holds up and what needs expansion (or trimming).

Right now I’m at about 8500 words into a document that needs a minimum of about 44,000 (roughly 80 pages) and a maximum of about 71,000 (128 pages). I think 80 pages will be the best based on the last Kickstarter’s performance, as a nice blend of “I can deliver an equally-good product” and “not go broke.” Still, if there’s more content – and there can easily be more content – and the KS does very well, I can add it.

Art and Maps

This one’s going to need some serious art help, though.

At least three city maps, likely four or five: Northwatch (Norðvörn) citadel, the lower city, and the towns of Ainferill (Riverbend) and Vegghofn (Sallyport). Probably a map – really an encounter location – for another village that forms a major nexus of conflict for the area.

Lots of character art. Not every NPC gets drawn up, of course, but some of the main ones need detailing. Lots of opportunity for folks that do character sketches here.

A few full- or half-page scenes of key conflicts. Like this one:

So please forgive me if my blog content is a bit muted, or only happens in fits and starts: I’m head down at the keyboard.

But if you really want to help me get a jump on things, especially the city maps, you might consider supporting the current Kickstarter for a shelf-worth print run of the Dragon Heresy version of Hall of Judgment. Every now and then, I get a short spell of orders for Dragon Heresy; that makes for some serious help in buying art, paying writers, and generally making more new content.