The control point based rules in my various grappling supplements are good. But they can be adjusted to taste in various ways to increase the fun in grappling at your table.

TG: The History

GURPS Martial Arts: Technical Grappling evolved in the writing and testing, as all books do. Originally, DX penalties and ST penalties alternated with each increment in control points. First you’d lose a point in DX, then ST, then DX, then ST, etc. That was too complicated to track; the goal was “make each CP valuable” but this wasn’t the way.

Eventually, we decided that for two ST 10 foes (because you need to normalize DX penalties based on fraction of ST, blah blah) that every 2 CP was -1 DX and -1 ST. Because the more you’re grappled, the harder it is to apply your full ST effectively. The ST reductions were really important to the progression, and normalizing it (it took 4 CP to do -1 DX to a ST 20 creature) was also an important balancing act.

However . . . re-figuring ST on a point-by-point basis was cumbersome at best.

D&D and Dungeon Grappling

Making a super-simple application of the core control points principle for application in Swords and Wizardry, Peter Dell’Orto and I came up with the idea of control thresholds, based on ST. Each threshold had some impact on hit rolls, damage rolls, etc. But the advantage here was you only had to track breakpoints. This was lower book-keeping, each CP had value in your ability to spend them, and sped up play.

Applying this to D&D5e, the Pathfinder RPG, and fleshing it out and improving it for Swords and Wizardry was the point of Dungeon Grappling. I was able to make a two page “DG Quick Start” which appeared in Lost Hall of Tyr. So it was clear that at the core, simplifying a “Technical/Dungeon” grappling system for 5e (and therefore Dragon Heresy) was fun, fast, playable, and with the right approach, simply better than the existing stuff out there.

Fantastic Dungeon Grappling

When I got the license to turn Lost Hall of Tyr into Hall of Judgment, I also got permission to put in the simplified grappling concepts as alternate rules. I’d learned a ton about speed of play since 2011/2012 when I wrote Technical Grappling, and re-applying all of those lessons in a simplified form for speed of play at the table was both gratifying and, ultimately, successful.

The playtesters tweaked out the system until in most cases it ran smoothly. As always, when normal ST folks fight other normal ST folks, things work out OK. For most characters, Wrestling and the like are backup skills, but for “fighty types,” they tend to be in the 14-16 range. Credible but not dominating. Solid skill levels, but basically you’re looking at front-line ST (14-17) and Wrestling at DX or DX+1. That”s 1d to about 1d+3 control points per successful attack. Against a non-fighter type, a successful hit will mostly be in the -2 to -4 to DX range, with excursions to -8 if you get a good roll vs a weaker character. Against an equal-ST foe, it will take two turns to get to “Greater than CM” level.

Even so, it’s not that hard to have that first successful grapple take you from Wrestling-14 or Wrestling-16 to anywhere from Wrestling-6 to Wrestling-12; the upper one isn’t bad. The lower is in “death spiral” territory, from one attack.

Part of the reason the penalties were set the way they were is that the adjustment of ST was nixed. No longer would one be recalculating ST (and thus damage, encumbrance, etc) on a turn-by-turn basis. In fact, even the concept of adjusting ST at all was dropped, so that the answer to “what’s my grappling damage” is always “whatever it says on your character sheet” and even if that doesn’t work out, you can always just say “it’s your thrust, +1 per die if you have Wrestling at DX+1.”

If you have Wrestling or Judo at DX+4 or better, well, you really care about grappling and will have looked it up and written it down in advance. That’s “primary skill” level, not “close-combat backup.”

So the basic thought was -1 DX per Control Point, or ‘against typical DX, which is often in the 12-16 range, once you pass your control maximum you’re immobilized.’ So the upper bound was set at -16, which would immobilize just about anyone, even some of the characters I’ve seen played with weapon skills well above 20. Halving the penalties at each lower increment seemed good, it had a -4 (the usual GURPSy grappling penalty) in the realm of 4-8 control points (a fairly typical successful grappling attack), and it played OK in the tests.

That you maxed out at “you can’t apply more CP than your Control Maximum” helped a bit, but it was usually possible to get up to that point in a turn or two, and, well: death spiral. The point of grappling is a bit of back-and-forth struggle. And I hate “I win!” buttons. In many of the tests, “I win!” wasn’t present. But it didn’t take much to tip that scale.

Don’t Get Grappled?

Some of the things that we got rid of, like adjusting ST penalties, were for bookkeeping reduction. One of the things we nixed, which is penalties or bonuses to control points or effects due to size modifier differences, was a direct nod to the epic nature of the source material. Human-sized, mighty-thewed heroes could wrestle and contend with ogres, cyclops (cyclopses? Cyclopes!), and other giant creatures because they were epic, mighty-thewed heroes.

Having King Kong grapple you and poof you’re helpless is realistic. It’s believable. And it’s boring. It’s especially boring if the only response to fighting moderately strong creatures (or gaggles of small ones) is “don’t get grappled.”

So while the results on the as-published table aren’t wrong, there are many cases where fun can be increased by tuning things a bit.

Suggested Tweaks

If the existing rules don’t work for you, try the following:

  • Your Control Maximum remains unchanged, and equal to Lifting ST
  • Alter the Control Point Effects table as follows
Control Points DX Penalty
up to 1/10 Lifting ST
 Up to 0.5 x Lifting ST -2
>0.5xLift ST to 1.0xLift ST -4
>1.0xLift ST to 1.5x Lift ST -6
>1.5xLift ST to 2.0xLift ST -8
Greater than 2xLifting ST -12
  • You cannot apply more CP than your Control Maximum unless you All-Out Attack, which doubles your allowed Control Maximum

If you choose to not All-Out Attack, your CM drops and your applied control instantly drops to your CM if it’s greater, much like if you release a grapple to parry your grapple is instantly lost or diminished.

Take-aways

  • The penalties are gentler and extend to higher applied control totals. This will allow more back-and-forth between grapplers
  • Normal folks with 1d to 1d+3 control points per hit (1-9 CP, or 4-6 CP per attack on the average) will take four to six turns, or four to six seconds, of unopposed grappling to bring someone to -12 penalty, which will take most non-experts to either “can’t roll” or “you can only succeed in an attack if you crit or AoA)
  • King Kong or a Large Dragon at ST 50 will still be hitting you with 5d+2 control damage; that’s 19-20 points, which is enough to put most folks in the -6 to -8 penalty range in one shot; that’s believable
  • Maintaining dominating control of more than your Lifting ST requires All-Out Attacking; you’re certainly not doing anything else but “controlling the other guy.” This seems a worthy trade off for totally immobilizing someone of basically equal to your ST
  • The lower penalty rates will give an opportunity to counter-grapple. That’s not always present in these contests, and it should be.

More Tweaks

  • The -6 penalty line can simply be deleted. More than your Lifting ST in applied control points, and you’re at -8 to DX. Then for each additional multiple of your Lifting ST, take an additional -4.
  • You could halve the penalties, but at the -2, -6, and -12 levels (which would be halved to -1, -3, and -6), apply a -1, -2, or -3 per die penalty to control point damage on a successful attack. That would make a lot more ebb and flow in control points, as experts will be removing some control much of the time, and truly immobilizing someone is a constant struggle. This puts fiddle back, and “no, you’re just screwed” is a legit part of some grappling holds
  • Fantastic Dungeon Grappling is designed to work without many of the more complex grappling options from GURPS Martial Arts. Instead of All-Out Attack, things like Arm Lock might be required to increase control beyond the CM, so locking a joint opens up truly large penalties.
  • Applying pain, from Martial Arts, would be another way to apply large penalties without increasing CM, so that by moving up to your Control Maximum and then applying a Pain affliction to the foe, that would compound the effects without requiring All-Out Attack. Since Arm Lock and the like default to flat grappling skills anyway, “make a successful attack to apply pain” would not even be a deviation from the rules – you just can’t buy it up with the (non-existent in the Dungeon Fantasy RPG) Technique rules.

Parting Shot

Right now, the emergent behavior from the rules as written tend to be “who grapples first grapples best,” “don’t get grappled by big, strong foes,” and “bring friends,” since you might need their help to escape from grapples. Also, grappling is as fast and decisive as getting brained by a swung sword.

You’re just as “Save or Spectate” if a ST 21 guy with a two-handed sword and weapon master hits you: Swing damage for that is 4d-1, +3 for the sword and +8 for having your primary weapon at DX+2 or more. That’s 4d+10, or 14-34 points of cutting damage. That’s a one-hit kill on a human. Strong guys with grappling or strong guys with weapons are very dangerous, period. You can’t armor yourself much vs grappling, but it’s thrust-based, not swing based. Balances out.

None of these things are wrong or bad.

However, if you want grappling to be decisive but still allow for some good back-and-forth, try some or all of the tweaks above . . . and let me know how they go.

GameHole Con 2018 – Con Report

Well, I survived! This was the first convention that I’d attended since my journey to GenCon 2017, as part of my first foray as being part of the con as Gaming Ballistic, LLC. I was, more importantly it turned out, also there as part of my Kickstarter rewards for backing the Dungeon Fantasy Roleplaying Game (Powered by GURPS) at the “play the game with Kromm” level.

That’s important for this journey to Madison, Wisconsin for two reasons.
1. I played through what would turn into the linear adventure Lost Hall of Tyr (for D&D5e) there for the first two times
2. I got to know the Dungeon Fantasy RPG for the first time

My mission for this Convention, then? To demonstrate and run Hall of Judgment, the first licensed adventure or supplement of any kind for the Dungeon Fantasy RPG. To talk with the SJG folks (Phil and Steve were both there) about further ideas for supporting GURPS. To get to meet in person folks like Matt Finch, Erik Tenkar, Jason Hobbs, and many others whom I’ve interacted with – and who have helped me so much – in getting my games off the launch pad. I simply could not have done what I did on Dragon Heresy and Hall of Judgment without an absolutely crucial hour or so with Zach Glazar, who pumped an incredible amount of InDesign Starter information into my head.

I also was hoping to sell a few copies of my product, which was a secondary goal but a real one.

Let’s recap. Continue reading “GameHole Con 2018 Trip Report!”

I got a quick bit of feedback on using Conditional Injury in actual play. Recall this article was not playtested, and mostly theoretical. Granted I was musing on it for years, but it never really got a good stress test. So someone wrote me with one:

Dingo (Discord Forums) wrote:

A lot shorter than planned and got a ‘longer’ fight expected which I’ll do a proper play writeup for; but regarding the Conditional Damage it worked really well. It encouraged superior fighters to allow themselves to take more risks because being hit for low-damage hits wasn’t as threatening as before where 7 hits alone was enough to have you suffering penalties; there were a lot more all-out attacks and all-out defenses to set up counterattacks. It felt, to put a word to it – a great deal ‘meatier’. A 3v1 fight of one skilled fighter with just DR 1 on the torso involved a lot more hits than before without worrying about an instant escalation. Weak hits were still dangerous due to failed-HT rolls potentially making injury condition worse, but in practice this meant that the immediate danger wasn’t HP (a limited resource) but shock penalties, stunning, and knockdown – both attacking and defending these became priorities. Jabs to the face (using Defensive Attack) became a very effective tactic in the 3v1 for the trained fighter. So all in all, a good fun fight that didn’t cause the GM panic of ‘well it could end in 3 hits’.

Interesting. I’d not have figured that.

This report suggests that the GURPS Death Spiral has perhaps been tamed a bit. Risking more wounds, rather than fewer, wasn’t really a design goal. But then, it wasn’t not a design goal either. Some of the emergent behavior, such as more strikes to the face looking for knockdown and stun, are outstanding results, the kind of emergence one hopes for. An increased use of All-Out-Attack (I will take a minor wound in order to deal a major one!) seems more accurate for a game that tends to have to remind GMs that mooks, unskilled mooks, will not do the math on defending like players do. They want to hit you, and will happily fling Telegraphic All-Out or Telegraphic Committed (+8 and +6 to hit, respectively for the Determined option) blows to do so.

So this is a good report. I still have to do my Designer’s Notes commentary on the article; hopefully I’ll get to that today.

Ooo! Follow-up comment by Dingo (Discord Forums)

yeah it quickly became very appropriate to approach the fight less from ‘put hurt on the opponent’ and instead shift to ‘control your opponent’. The player I was testing it with wasn’t so confident with the grappling rules as to put that entirely in scope (It’s what we’re gonna add in for the next test to see how it comes together); but quickly made realizations like the importance of hits that risk stunning, or in a group fight – the fact going for more dangerous hits can be worthwhile if you’re confident you can handle the backlash.

Ultimately the fact victory comes down to a status game rather than a counter game meant you immediately had to shift tactics away from damage/attrition and instead towards control and disabling.
Especially if your opponent has a high enough HT that you can’t rely on Cumulative Wound severity increases without All Out Attack (Strong); one exchange against someone with 13 HT resulted in the player doing -repeated- Defensive Jabs to the face, solely waiting for a stun and outlasting their counterattacks. Once the stun hit – AoA (Strong) to the face over, and over, and over until they either were crippled from a sufficiently high damage hit, or recovered from stun (at which point it returned to jabs and defensive)

So really interesting stuff here, in that “go repeatedly to the face, and when stunned, ground and pound” is rather nifty because that’s exactly what you see in MMA fights with two skilled foes that are pretty tough, by dint of repeated experience.

I got a sometimes-rare opportunity last night – I got to use the rules I’ve written in the core of their design intent. In this case, it was the simplified and upgraded rules for grappling that appear in my recent Hall of Judgment book: Fantastic Dungeon Grappling.

These took the method of GURPS Martial Arts: Technical Grappling, and seasoned them with lessons learned from DnD5e and Dragon Heresy. Unlike TG, which take 50 pages to do what they set out to do, Fantastic Dungeon Grappling (FDG) does it in just shy of four pages of text. That includes art.

Design Intent

Fantastic Dungeon Grappling is designed to be three things, and where that intent is the same as the original Technical Grappling, to improve them over the original.

  1. It’s designed to be more easily understood and better organized
  2. It’s designed to be fast and loose and somewhat abstract at the table
  3. It’s designed to enable effective grappling in cinematic play, because the Dungeon Fantasy RPG is a cinematic, “this goes to 11” game and genre

I’m not going to belabor the point: mission accomplished here, both for the player and GM. Continue reading “Fantastic Dungeon Grappling: A self-review”

Dragon Heresy: The Last 48 Hours

As always, the last 48 hours of a Kickstarter are crucial. One can frequently match the first two days’ funding totals in the last two days, and for Dragon Heresy, if we did that, we’d be seriously flirting with the big stretch goal at $16,000 for an offset run with sewn binding.

We are currently sitting at roughly $11,000, with the initial funding goal having been $3,500.

But let’s back up a bit.

What is Dragon Heresy?

Dragon Heresy is a stand-alone Fantasy RPG based on a grittier take on the Fifth Edition game engine. It uses a two-level target hit roll, and differentiated between skill and endurance (“vigor”), injury (“wounds”), and retains Fifth Edition’s excellent use of Conditions, including Exhaustion. You do NOT need other Fifth Edition books to play the game; character generation, combat, social standing, flyting, grappling, wilderness and survival, and monsters are all in the book.

The setting is strongly Norse-inspired, which influences the cultures that are playable, but also the mechanics, since the vikings’ use of lightweight, buckler-gripped shields as very nearly the primary weapon heavily influenced the combat rules options.

Finally, it integrates one of the best grappling mechanics written for such games, making grappling interchangeable with striking on a blow-by-blow basis. One new player played a dragonborn berserker whose primary weapon was a net with no slowdown in play, full use of the rules, and outstandingly fun outcomes.

Tell Me More

No problem. I’ve done a lot of that – here are some additional resources for those who wish to check out the project

Podcasts and Video

Reviews

There have been two reviews of the pre-release copy of the game (it’s fully written).

  • Follow Me and Die! took a look and liked what he saw
  • Moe Tousignant is in the middle of a truly comprehensive review, and allowed me to host his first two sections on my blog
  • James Spahn (White Star and other games) took a look at a pre-release copy and liked what he saw.

The Kickstarter: What You Get

There are only a few pledge levels

  • At $5 you get a stripped down version of the combat rules in sort-of edited PDF format, with minimal layout and no art. It’s for taking the combat rules for a test drive
  • At $20 you get a full-color, hyperlinked, layered PDF
  • At $50 you get a Black and White POD hardback and the PDF
  • At the $100 sponsorship level, the hardback is upgraded to color
  • At $500, you get everything from the $100 level and I will hand-make for  you an authentic viking shield if you live within the USA. It will be fit to you up to 35.5” diameter, with hide-glued planks, Painted striðskjold battle shield with linen stitching and custom paint job1oz hide edging, linen stitching, and a hand-carved oak handle. This is basically “buy the shield and get the game for free.”

What Can You Do?

Obviously, the best thing for me is for you to head over and pledge. It’s a great game, with a great layout, and even if I do say so myself, the initial book block (the interior pages without the binding) from the most likely vendor unless we hit the big offset print goal are simply superb.

If you are interested in the game but can’t pledge, I’d ask that you share it on social media so that others that might be interested might see. Like Fifth Edition rules but want more grit? You’ll like what you see here. Like Norse mythology and vikings? You’re a prime candidate to love the game.

48 hours to go. Please check it out, and pledge if you can!

 

Play a berserker or viking warrior in Dragon Heresy, a fast-paced game that brings viking spirit and grit to Fifth Edition with new rules, a complete setting, and tons of challenges.Dragon Heresy on Twitch

This is a bit of an experiment. I’ve never streamed on Twitch, but I’m giving it a shot and streaming Dragon Heresy tonight!

The folks at Roles to Astonish, a newish channel, have agreed to come on and play Dragon Heresy with me as the GM.

Roles to Astonish: Developer Spotlight – Dragon Heresy

We’ll be walking through a first level starter adventure that I’m writing to support the Dragon Heresy release. Yes, if it’s done by the time I move the Dragon Heresy PDF to final form and to print (July) backers will get it for free in PDF.

Right now, it’s more a skeleton (ahem) than anything else, but I’ve done free-form play with Dragon Heresy before, and it works out just fine.

Come check out the game! It starts at 5pm Central Time, and will go for up to four hours.

A Dragon Heresy Introductory Set Kickstarter backer was asking about something I mentioned in one of the podcasts I was on this last weekend, which also appeared in one of the playtests from way back: The Runic Berserker, also known as the Berserker Path of Galdureiði: The Path of Wrathful Power.

The Path of Galdureiði is not in the Introductory Set. Yet. If we hit the $10K stretch goal, it will be one of the options for “More Content” that backers will get to vote on. It’s only about 550 words, and the stretch goal adds 10,000, so it’s definitely not the only thing that can happen.

BERSERKER: PATH OF GALDUREIÐI

You feel the pulse of the earth, the surge of the flames, the bite of winter’s fury, and the vast power of the storms. Those forces are not quiet, and the world is angry. You mirror that passion, channeling the world’s energy as your own through affinity with the true runes of power.

When you choose this path at 3rd level, you learn to channel your own rage and the energy of the world around you through a set of magically attuned runestones or runic tattoos that you keep on your person. The runes focus your energy and allow you to channel that harnessed power despite the red haze of rage through which you see the world. You cannot use the powers without these arcane symbols, so Berserkers of this path will work the stones into their clothing or weapons to prevent losing them through misfortunate accident or the willful malice of an enterprising thief. You may also permanently brand or mark the runes on your body with the aid of a 10th or higher level arcanist who has knowledge of the rune; a 10th level Berserker can help inscribe all of them.

THE RUNES OF POWER

The runes are magical sigils as well as letters, and each has one or more associations—with a god or goddess, a concept, a thing, or an action. The meaning is always layered and fluid.

The runes used for the Path of Galdureiði are not all the runes that exist, but upon choosing the path at 3rd level, the Berserker gains familiarity with some of the common meanings and methods of channeling the runes to invoke certain effects and powers. As her understanding and attunement increase, she obtains the ability to “reverse” the runes and achieve more difficult or subtle effects.

THE PRIMAL RUNES

Powerful but basic, these runes are the first that Berserkers use to focus their rage.

  • Hagall. The power of storms to destroy. Associated with both lightning and thunder damage.
  • Isa. Ice and the power of winter. Associated with cold damage.
  • Kaunaz. Fire and torchlight. Associated with fire damage.
  • Raido. The change in circumstances that breaks a deadlock; travel and movement. Associated with control damage (grappling).
  • Sowulo. The radiance of the sun and the boon of salvation through the gods. Associated with radiant damage.
  • Sverdaz. The sword of kings; another warrior’s rune. Associated with slashing damage.
  • Telewaz. The thrust spear that justly slays; the warrior’s rune and sigil of Ziu. Associated with piercing damage.
  • Thurisaz. Magical force and the power of the giants; Donnar’s hammer. Associated with force damage.
  • Uruz. Strength and the power to smash. Associated with bludgeoning damage.

Rune Strike

When you choose the Path of Galdureiði at 3rd level, when you rage, each turn you may, as a bonus action, invoke the power of a rune at a foe whom you have struck with a melee weapon. When you do so, the foe takes 2d4 damage (or control, if you invoke Raido), with the damage type being based on one of the primal runes. Once you have chosen the rune, it infuses your rage and persists until your rage ends. When your rage does cease, you must make a DC 12 Constitution save, or suffer an additional level of exhaustion (as described in Conditions). If you rage again, you may choose a different rune. Armor and frantic defense both apply normally to the rune strike damage.

 

This post is for errata reports for Lost Hall of Tyr. I’ll post an ever-expanding table of what the suggested change is, the potential correction, and other notes.

Page From This To This Notes
1 target and 2d20 target-and-2d20 hypenation should match “target-and-3d6” format
1 target-and- 3d6 target-and-3d6 remove extra space between hyphen and 3d6
1 Open Game Licence v 1.0a Open Game Licence v 1.0a All bold for the formal title of OGL and SRD
1 Swords and Wizardy Complete Rules, Swords and Wizardry Complete Rules remove comma at end to keep format like all others
1 5.1 5.1 5.1 is part of the SRD title, bold it
1 Dungeon Grappling (small caps) Dungeon Grappling this is maybe the only place where titles aren’t in small caps; bold regular text only
1 Matthew J. Finch Matthew J. Finch. Period after Finch in both cases it appears
2 Ferth (FERTH) FERÐ (ferð) We use the funky th thing Ð for other places, let’s do it here, too
3 Unbookmarked Use TOC as basis for bookmarks; add bookmarks in PDF for all tables and box-text PDF has great hyperlinks and TOC, but no bookmarks
3 The Ridge Path, Dread River, Goblin Valley, The Domstollinn The Ridge Path, Dread River, Goblin Valley, The Domstollinn Bold section titles, as they’re higher level than chapter heads but lower than topic heads
5 Find/Replace 5e in bold regular with . . . 5e in small caps Keep all book and edition titles consistently formatted in Bold/Italic/Small Caps
5 The product introduces the “control” damage type. Each monster in the scenario is detailed in its Bestiary, complete with stats for grappling attacks (and the equivalent of a hit point maximum for grappling) that will be instantly familiar to even novice players of the game in any edition.
Grapple by making a normal hit roll (adding your bonus if you are proficient in Athletics, the 5e grappling skill), and if you exceed the Grapple DC— think of it as ‘Armor Class for grappling’—you roll damage, based on the hit die for your class and your Strength modifier. The more control damage you accrue, the more restrained the foe.
Grapple by making a normal hit roll (adding your bonus if you are proficient in Athletics, the 5e grappling skill), and if you exceed the Grapple DC— think of it as ‘Armor Class for grappling’—you roll damage, based on the hit die for your class and your Strength modifier. Dungeon Grappling introduces the “control” damage type. The more control damage you accrue, the more restrained the foe.
Each monster in Lost Hall of Tyr is detailed in its Bestiary, complete with stats for grappling attacks (and the equivalent of a hit point maximum for grappling) that will be instantly familiar to even novice players of the game in any edition.
I suspect that the phrasing in the book currently was edited beyond recognition; it really makes no sense as it reads. The rephrase is all the same sentences in a different order. Flows better, I think.
5 conttrol control typo
6 Incapacitated means incapacitated Incapacitated means incapacitated italics for emphasis
6 web web all spell names should be in italics unless they’re in titles
6 space – endash – space emdash This is fixed in all other chapters but the preface, which I rewrote. This is my GURPS training showing, as SJG doesn’t really use emdashes.
6 Dragon Heresy and Dragon Heresy RPG format in bold/italics/Small Caps book titles
7 Lost Hall of Tyr format in bold/italics/Small Caps book titles
7 modified ability score modified ability score. missing period
7 space – endash – space emdash This is fixed in all other chapters but the preface, which I rewrote. This is my GURPS training showing, as SJG doesn’t really use emdashes.
8 see Alternate Settings see Alternate Settings italics to emphasize that it’s a box title/topic header
9 freeman freemen
9 , and axes, they left , and axes, the hobgoblins left clarity
9 Without warning, ice exploded Without warning, winter exploded ice gets repeated in the next sentence, so tweaked
10 Elunad, a High Lady of Elunad, High Lady of too many “a” in this paragraph
11 Moving the tower and hall . . . Let’s make this a 4th bullet? It could stay the same; if we change it, I’d move the “Moving the tower” sentence between what are currently the 2nd and 3rd bullets, since the 2nd one is terrain, the dungeon is sorta terrain, and then we talk about gods
11 There is also a great deal of both rumor and fact . . . The Hall . .. , A mystical . . ., and There were several pathways are all bullet points, and should get the shield treatment This may break layout, and so we can forget it if needed
14 monsters and other things with hyperlinks bold them? I’ve seen this in OSR modules, where you might see: the hall is guarded by four kobolds, who are sleepy” or something like that. It might be useful to indicate, as we do with hyperlinks, that there’s more information in the back of the book. We can use underlines as well.
15 See Wilderness Survival for See Wilderness Survival for italicize the reference
15 the following table the Alternate Travel Plans table the table is no longer following in the layout!
16 Sploosh Sploosh italicize the reference
16 1d8-1×10 (1d8-1)x10 parens around 1d8-1
16 x10 ×10 use multiplication symbol for this, not “x”; occurs a few times on this page
17 jump, feather fall, levitiation, etc spell names should be in italics if they’re not in titles
19 Rewards. REWARDS. Rewards is actually a run-in caps title
19 awakened tree awakened tree (or another emphasis) as with line 29, some call-out of monsters that appear in the bestiary seems right to me here
19 greater invisibility greater invisibility spells in italics
21 hob and hobgoblin hob and hobgoblin monsters indicated by emphasis
21 inflicting control damage an athletics test control damage is “legacy code” and doesn’t apply anymore
21 a t wizard suffers a wizard suffers extraneous bold t
21 100′ per round (a mile every five minutes) 100′ per combat round (a mile every five minutes). differentiate between combat rounds and nebulous rounds in next section
21 dire wolves dire wolves monsters indicated by emphasis
24 x10 ×10 a careful execution of find/replace will catch this one too
25 see Alternatives, below see Alternatives, below italicize the reference
25 node stage I changed the lingo to be less esoteric in a rewrite
25 Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3 bold them? secondary run-in title?
26 runes are mentioned show the actual runes in graphics, so players/GM can visualize? This might be a layout challenge, but if we could fit the blue runestones with the actual runes in them here, I think it would be cool.

Did you Play Lost Hall at the Grappling Smackdown at GenCon?

I know a few folks – maybe one or two – who played what was called then “The Tower of Justice” or “Grappling Smackdown” with me in the IGDN booth at GenCon this year.

Friday and Saturday mornings, 10am start time. Each day was 7-8 people, some who’d signed up, some who didn’t.

As the book that will be now titled Lost Hall of Tyr: Dómstóllinn is closing in on its basic funding goal, I want to give you folks playtest credit. And a free copy.

So: email me! You have my card from the event. You can also hit me at gamingballisticllc@gmail.com, or leave a comment to this post. Let me know which game you attended, what character you played, the name you wish to be credited with, and the most memorable thing that happened to you during the game.

This is a bit of a cry for help. I know a few folks – maybe one or two – who played what was called then “The Tower of Justice” or “Grappling Smackdown” with me in the IGDN booth at GenCon this year. Friday and Saturday mornings, 10am start time.

Each day was 7-8 people, some who’d signed up, some who didn’t.

As the book that will be now titled Domstollinn: Lost Hall of Tyr approaches both Kickstarter and finalization, I want to give you folks playtest credit. And a free copy.

So: email me! You have my card from the event. You can also hit me at gamingballisticllc@gmail.com, or leave a comment to this post. Let me know which game you attended, what character you played, the name you wish to be credited with, and the most memorable thing that happened to you during the game.