Pyramid #3/57 – The Devil’s Chariot

This is an article-by-article review of Pyramid #3/57: Gunplay. While I don’t usually do this, the subject matter of this issue is just what this blog ordered, and even if one of my own articles is in it, I really think every article, and nearly every word, of this issue is worth reading. So, a series of (hopefully) shortish posts. You can find the first installment on Modern Warfighter: Gear here.
The Devil’s Chariot ( +Hans-Christian Vortisch )


The Devil’s Chariot is basically ‘everything you could ever want to know about the Mi-24V “Hind” helicopter. I mean everything. The article is divided into five sections.

I have to call out one bit in particular in the introduction. Hans uses a quote from the Bible to introduce the article, a long one from Revelations 9:7-10. It is totally creepy how well the quote can apply to helicopter gunships:

And the shapes of the locusts were like unto horses prepared unto battle; and on their heads were as it were crowns like gold, and their faces were as the faces of men. And they had hair as the hair of women, and their teeth were as the teeth of lions. And they had breastplates, as it were breastplates of iron, and the sound of their wings was as the sound of chariots of many horses running to battle. And they had tails like unto scorpions, and there were stings in their tails: and their power was to hurt men five months.

So after a short introduction on what may well be, as he says, “The world’s most famous helicopter,” he gets right to it.

MIL Mi-24V “Hind-E” (Russia, 1976-1986)

This is the introductory section. The vehicle is described in real-world terms, broadly. It covers some nicknames, as well as the production and usage history, including the Mi-35 export version. It then gives a brief rundown of who uses them, and in some cases how many were purchased and remain functioning. You definitely get a flavor for who bought them, and also that you’d better be prepared to spend significant maintenance effort on them – 75% of Uganda’s purchased rotorcraft are out of service!

The Mi-24V in Detail

When Hans says detail, he means detail.

The first bit covers the construction and armoring of the airframe, again in real-world terms, making it amenable to SWAG conversion to other systems that can base armor protection off of type and thickness of material. It briefly touches on the helicopter’s reputation for unvulnerability (the famous scene from the original Red Dawn where it shrugs off an RPG hit comes to mind)  and where that may have originated, and where it’s wrong.

Engine, payload, fuel system, electronics. Crew compartment and flight systems. GURPS skills required to successfully operate the craft. Gunsights. And a detailed and specific Hit Location Table with location penalties to hit each place, with footnotes talking about details and DR of each location. It’s well done, and I think all vehicles should have one.

In case you want to bring friends, Hans describes the layout and capacity of the cargo/passenger area, you can bring either four or eight friends along.

Hans has a penchant for weapon statistics and details, and this article proves no exception. He probably lists every single possible armament for the craft. Though the carrying capacity is surprisingly limited, mostly by engine power, the hardpoint rating for each mount is given. Then he details all the weapon loads used for the craft.

Mi-24V Armament


Without going into too many details, any new weapons are given the usual treatment. The write-ups include wonderful details such as design quirks (you can only fire ten bursts of any size with the main 12.7mm machinegun!) in addition to usual ammo load and usage notes.

The vehicle statline is provided on p. 20, along with the detailed armament table summarizing nine different weapons that can be mounted to the vehicle.

Using the Mi-24V


The article finishes up with some notes on use. First, how to get one in the first place, by nefarious or not-so-nefarious means. Hard to approach but easy to steal, seems like. Notes on how they’re used with the rules in GURPS Action 2 for chases and attacks are provided.

The article touches very briefly on operational employment (in pairs or trios) and covers why. A text box notes what movies you can see the Mi-24 (or mocked up ones) in action.

The last few paragraphs cover in meticulous detail every single thing found on the pilots or in the cabin of one of these aircraft. Right down to insect repellant and water purification tablets.

Parting Shot

Hard to say anything other than “it’s that complete.” If you are looking for a scary adversary or a worthy prize – but not something as sophisticated and expensive as say the AH-64D – you’ll find it here. The article is encyclopedic in scope and tone, but I’d be hard pressed to find anything missing.

2 thoughts on “Pyramid #3/57 – The Devil’s Chariot

  1. The ten bursts limit is one of those extremely weird Soviet things, like autoloaders that only work when the barrel is elevated to a specific position. It's just . . . why? What the hell?

    It cries out for a Dirty Harry moment – "I know what you're thinking. Did I fire nine bursts from my 12.7mm machine gun, or ten? HEY, CAN YOU EVEN HEAR ME OVER THE ROTORS? Ah, the hell with it."

  2. When the Generals explain how something is a feature and not a bug this one gets a reverse of the usual explanation about small magazines encouraging marksmanship. "We want the gunner to commit at least 10% of his ammo to every burst.". ..

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