I’m working through my Grappling Smackdown scenario here, and setting the DCs for various tasks is a thing. I wanted to make a table to quickly inform me of roughly how hard something might be, so I figured I’d share the results. This isn’t a revelation, but it’s useful to me so it might be useful to you.

One useful tidbit from the post on The Standard Array: Joe Human PC with the standard array and who is proficient in a given task will sport a 13.5 attribute as a median, and of course have a +2 proficiency bonus. This makes the average starting boosts to the die rolls about +3.5.

I’ve picked out some example DCs. Obviously moving the DC up or down a point changes the odds of success (on the average) by 5%.

DC 6

At this level, a potted plant that isn’t proficient in the skill has a 50% chance of noticing something or accomplishing a task. I’m having to significantly question why bother rolling at all here. It’s a level that might get interesting if due to unfavorable terrain or darkness or something everyone gets disadvantage.

DC 8

A first level, proficient character with a 10 ability score will still succeed 75% of the time, or a non-proficient character with a 14, a solid but not exceptional DX, for example. This is a good level for a simple task which requires some talent or expertise to get through, but by and large will be a speed bump. Even my potted plant, above (-5 ability score, not proficient) if allowed a roll will succeed on a 13 or higher, 40% of the time.

DC 11

This is still an entry level task, where a completely non-proficient average guy can succeed 50% of the time. The median starting human PC will be succeeding on this by rolling an 8, so 65% chance of success. There’s only a 10% chance of failure for a typical proficient 10th level PC operating in the expert zone. A DC 11 means that it’s still expected most folks will do this well, but the odds of failure for the uninitiated are high.

At DC 11 and DC 12, a non-proficient character rolling against one of their lowest two ability scores (9-11 as a human) will more or less have a 50% chance of success. So it’s the dividing line for “requires some sort of atypical ability or advantage to succeed better than half the time.” Atypical for PCs, that is.

DC 14

Odds of a median first through fourth level PC who is proficient in the skill failing this roll is about 50%. At this level if you’re positing (say) a forked path for adventurers of 1st through 4th level (+2 proficiency), you’re basically saying “flip a coin.” I feel this is a pretty important DC level, as it sets the boundaries for making decisions in adventures. Want your “secret pathway” to come up about half the time? That’s about a DC 14 check . . . but you better be darn sure you have it in your mind that if everyone is allowed a roll, half the median party will fail, and half will succeed, assuming their attributes and skills are spread around a bit.

Anything harder than DC 14 will require advantage, high attributes, and high proficiency to make it a cake-walk. For example, a +4 bonus and +4 proficiency, given as a 10th level character with an 18 or 19 ability score, will still fail this check 25% of the time, although if they have expertise or can eke out advantage from somewhere, they’ll only fail if they crit.

DC 17

Now you’re into telling the GM and PCs you expect them to fail. A first level PC will need to roll 14 or higher to succeed here, and even our hypothetical +8 bonus 10th level proficient character will need to roll 9 or higher (60%). An untrained person using their “dump stat” of (say) 9 or 10 will have a 75-80% failure rate here. Only a true expert (has Expertise in the skill) at high proficiency with an outstanding ability score will be looking at this as trivial.

DC 17, though, is also the level where your low-level party expert (+2 proficiency, +4 in their chosen skill at 4th level due to an ability score improvement) has a 50% chance of success. So much as DC 11 or 12 is the dividing line for making it hard for the unskilled, DC 17 is the line above which only the truly exceptional will succeed more than they fail.

DC 21

Now you’re just being mean. You need +5 proficiency, +5 attribute score, and you have a 50% chance of making this. It’s the break-even for high-level, high-skill “this is still hard” tests. At low level, you’re saying “only a crit will get you here, and only if you have a bonus, at that.” Again, one has to ask why bother unless it’s something that you think the PCs might try but it’ll be pretty silly. Well, yes, you could leap the chasm, but it’s DC 21 . . . chances of success are low.

Parting Shot

So, hopefully this will be of use as a quick reference, if nothing else. Good ability score bonuses to keep in mind are probably +0 (dump stat), +1.5 (median starting character), +3 (expert starting character), and +5 (fully developed unless you’re breaking the 20-maximum rule, as some classes do). Proficiencies are +2 (starting), +4 (mid-level), and +6 (pinnacle). Figure out how likely you want success to be, and adjust from there. Ergo, a handy table. Well, handy for me.

Ability Score Proficiency 25% Success 50% success 75% Success
0 2 18 13 8
0 4 20 15 10
0 6 22 17 12
1.5 2 19.5 14.5 9.5
1.5 4 21.5 16.5 11.5
1.5 6 23.5 18.5 13.5
3 2 21 16 11
3 4 23 18 13
3 6 25 20 15
5 2 23 18 13
5 4 25 20 15
5 6 27 22 17

Wodensday Wonderings is a new feature where I will discuss and comment on things that have sparked my interest of late. Sometimes (like today) it’ll be an animated discussion over mapped vs. mapless combat. Sometimes it might be a game design discussion. Or thoughts about why and why not of firearms and the like in fantasy gaming (to pick on a heated topic I saw on Facebook). More food for thought than “folks should do this,” this is my weekly free association column, so to speak. With that:

I was reading a Google+ post about using mapless/gridless combat, and the poster and commenters were musing about what was basically the tendency of players to precisely place their area effect spells for maximum effect. I’ve seen this too in GURPS games with both spells and grenades.

A quick fix – Random Location

It adds a die roll or three, but there’s an easy way to handle it. Assign scatter to every area effect spell. You can use either d6s or d8s. Continue reading “Spell Targeting – Margin of Error (5e, GURPS, others)”

Setting the Stage

Today Jeffro Johnson linked to a post by The Frisky Pagan where the author analyzes in some depth that Hit Points aren’t really wound points, and why. I pointed out what I call “The Quote,” which is found on p. 82 of the 1st Edition Dungeon Master’s Guide:

“It is quite unreasonable to assume that as a character gains levels of ability in his or her class that a corresponding gain in actual ability to sustain physical damage takes place. It is preposterous to state such an assumption, for if we are to assume that a man is killed by a sword thrust which does 4 hit points of damage, we must similarly assume that a hero could, on the average, withstand five such thrusts before being slain! Why then the increase in hit points? Because these reflect both the actual physical ability of the character to withstand damage – as indicated by constitution bonuses- and a commensurate increase in such areas as skill in combat and similar life-or-death situations, the “sixth sense” which warns the individual of some otherwise unforeseen events, sheer luck, and the fantastic provisions of magical protections and/or divine protection.”

Frisky acknowledged gracefully that reading the original source material is good – in his defense, I think Jeffro has articulated before that no one really knows or can suss out completely all of the gems buried in the barely-edited, scarcely-organized AD&D books.

But that’s not why I’m posting – even though The Frisky Pagan’s post is basically a giant endorsement of the tack I’m taking in Dragon Heresy.

No, the cool bits happened in the comments for Jeffro’s post. Continue reading “Save or Die revisited”

A retroactive (and oft-repeated) introduction: After an actual-play hiatus where I was mostly writing and playtesting for GURPS. I was invited to play in a Pathfinder game, and after a few sessions, it was time to buy the book and learn the rules! I decided to try and read the Pathfinder rules cover-to-cover and see what inspiration strikes, for good or ill!

This is a compilation of the links to read-throughs of Pathfinder-related material

Pathfinder Core Rulebook

0. Prelude
1. Introduction
2. Races

3a. Classes (Barbarian – Monk)
3b. Classes (Paladin – Wizard)

4a. Skills (Appraise – Heal)
4b. Skills (Intimidate – Use Magic Device)

5. Feats

6. Equipment

7. Additional Rules

8a. Combat (Part 1)
8b. Combat (Part 2)

***************

Now we get to the thing that makes the Dungeons and Dragons games somewhat unique, I think – the magic system. Or if not unique (lots of games have magic, and lots do it differently, better, or both), then perhaps it’s that .love it or hate it, the Vancian magic system is a staple of the genre, and Pathfinder builds off of that tradition. This chapter gives the rules for the magic system for those characters who can cast spells. This includes Wizards, Sorcerers, Clerics, Rangers, Paladins, Druids . . . just to start. It’s also possible for some non-casters to pick up some spells too: Rogues can pick up some minor magic, and I’m sure that option exists with the proper Feats allowed.

Casting Spells
Well, first you have to pick one. Knowing it is only enough if you’re one of those classes that can cast any spell they know at any time (subject to the limits on number of spells of a particular type they can cast per day). If you can’t just make stuff up that way, you must memorize, in advance, a number of spells based on your level and class. You can memorize multiple copies of a spell (again, subject to the limits on number of spells at a given level), but for these types of spellcasters, knowing “Wrigley’s Destroying Club” isn’t enough – you must memorize it ahead of time.

Concentration (and Distraction)


To cast a spell, you concentrate on it, subject to distraction. Though the key bit is delayed until rather later, the spell is most often cast right at the instant before your turn comes again – that is, you declare you cast the spell, and right before your turn comes again, your effect occurs. This allows every Tom, Dick, and Hairy to try and disrupt you. 
Distraction can come in many forms, and this section hits all of them. Injury, being grappled, getting slammed with a spell your own self, getting jostled or otherwise shaken-not-stirred, getting tornadoed, or being entangled. You can also “cast defensively,” which means that if you pass a DC 15+2*Spell Level check, you don’t provoke Attacks of Opportunity. Implicit here is that casting spells do provoke such attacks.

Most disruptions simply trigger a check with a DC proportional to the amount of disruption, and each disruption method has its own calculation. Check the handy table on p. 207, or the Pathfinder Reference Document, of course.

Counterspells

You can also use a spell to disrupt another caster. You have to delay your action with a Ready, and when your foe casts a spell, you can make a Spellcraft check at DC 15+your foe’s spell level. If you succeed, you may cast the freakin’ exact same spell being flung at you as a counterspell. Otherwise, you might try Dispel Magic, but that doesn’t always work (some spells can’t be vamoosed by dispel magic, but that’s a spell-by-spell thing). Given how few spell slots you get per day (and maybe if you’re always resting and renewing, this isn’t an problem), I would wonder how often counterspells get used.
Spell Failure

If a spell fails, by and large it just fizzles. No big deal other than the wasted slot and turn. No apparent backfires, dimensional warps, or generally icky consequences. Of course, if you’ve just lost or wasted one of the three memorized spells that makes you a unique special flower, well, that might piss you off a bit.
Special Spell Effects


The key bit here is the (brief) description of what spell bonus types stack and don’t. Dodge bonuses, circumstance bonuses (?), and racial bonuses seem to stack, but most other bonuses and penalties do not, and you only take the worst one. I could see this particular rule being roundly ignored. It’s equal opportunity both ways – since penalties stack as well – and would simplify game play.

Also here is a quick discussion of resurrection, which is the re-merging of the departed soul (literally departed – it goes on vacation on some other plane of existence, and you’re leaving it a voice mail to come back to work) with the body of the fallen. If he doesn’t want to come back, he doesn’t have to. And if enemies want to keep him away, there are ways of either trapping or warding the soul . . . or you can just filch the body, since you need it for the spell!

Multiple Spell Effects


This entire section made me want to dig out my +3 Red Pen of Editing, and write “stop being so wishy-washy” over and over. This little section is in rather desperate need of a few examples. Generally, if you’re providing different types of effects (like a DEX buff and a STR buff, or Enlarge Person and a CON boost or something) things probably go to plan. You can’t give multiple stacking spells of the same type: Two +1 boosts to STR are just +1, and a +1 and a +2 only gives you the benefit of the larger one. Finally, if you cast a series of spells with similar effects, usually it’s the most recent one that applies.

It also throws you under the bus with nice vague advice like “sometimes a spell can make another spell irrelevant!” Gee, thanks. This section is basically some vague GM guidelines, and there aren’t many nuggets here.

Spell Descriptions


At over 100 pages, Chapter 10 is the largest chapter in the book, and it’s “nothing” but spell after spell. So in Chapter 9, we break down the content of the spell descriptions, and what they mean.

School of Magic


Most belong to one of eight schools.

  • Abjuration: protection spells. Some such spells, especially if multiple spells are laid on top of each other, are detectable by Perception.
  • Conjuration: Movement and alteration of living creatures and some objects, I think. There are subschools which are pretty descriptive. Calling spells brings a critter to you from another plane. Creation forms magical constructs that disappear when the spell is over. Healing conjurations make you all better. Summoning brings a pre-existing creature or object to you, which goes back to where you sent it when killed or dismissed. Finally, Teleportation spells are when you’ve got to move it move it, and instantly transport things from place to place.
  • Divination: See secrets, know the future (the GM’s bane), find hidden things. 
  • Enchantment: Mind-affecting spells that change how the subject views you (charms), or force behavior (compulsions).
  • Evocation: boom sticks. Creating and manipulating magical energy, often in highly visible ways to cause damage.
  • Illusion: deceiving the senses of others. There are several kinds of illusions, such as figments (false sensations), glamers (glamour? altering how something looks, tastes, feels, etc.), and others. You’ll generally treat an illusion as real unless you take the time to interact with it, whereupon careful study might reveal and dispel it – that’s a saving throw.
  • Necromancy: Dead things, Mikey. Dead things. The undead, manipulating the forces of life and death.
  • Transmutation: Changing the properties of a thing or person from one form to another. This can inlcude polymorph to change your own body or that of another. There’s a very large block of text here on polymorph, so if that’s going to be your thing, you’d best read it.
Descriptors
Mostly these are fluff text that carry no game-mechanical interaction about the spell itself, but it does say that they can give interaction info on how it plays with other spells. 
Components

Spell components can be a big deal. You can’t cast a spell if you can’t fulfill the requirements! Verbal components require that you be able to speak clearly, as if on stage or giving a lecture. Somatic components are hand gestures (I had always thought they could be full-body movements. Guess not!). Material components are consumed in the casting, but the game says don’t bother to track them unless they carry a cost. Interesting. Focus is new to me, but it’s basically a non-consumed prop that helps cast the spell. Divine Focus is basically a holy something. It might be a sprig of a holy plant for druids and rangers, a holy symbol or reliquary for a cleric.
Casting Time

As mentioned earlier, some spells can be cast in a standard or swift action (which presumably mean they take effect right as you cast them), others are full-round actions (they go zap right before you take your next turn), others can take minutes, which means you get to take ten combat rounds to do this. Better have efficient friends. Or cast out of combat. You only make decisions about range,target, area effect when the spell takes effect, not at casting.
Range

Provides some pretty concise definitions and advice on ranged spells. Personal (you only), touch (up to six people using a full-round action might be allowed by some spells), then Close, Medium, Long, and Unlimited. Except when range is just expressed in feet. Most ranges seem to extend a bit with caster level (+5, +10, +40 feet per two full caster levels).
This section goes on for a bit, talking about rays, cones, spreading fogs, etc. It gives templates for various lines, cones, and radius effects, but the entire section is worth noting. 
Oops. Failed Saving Throw.

Duration


Most of the duration rules are straight-forward. One cool bit is that touch spells can be held for the entire duration of the spell, which means if you can cast some nasty fire-hand spell for a minute, you can set people’s face on fire for ten rounds. Not too shabby.
Saving Throws

Some spells can have their effects reduced or even eliminated with a saving throw (some spells are no-save allowed, though). The DC is 10+Spell Level+any applicable bonuses, which for dedicated spellcasters are going to be in the +3 to +5 range. So probably DC 15 and higher, by and large.
Spell Resistance

Basically AC for spells. You have to overcome this if your target has it – 1d20+Caster Level vs. your foe’s Spell Resistance, 
Arcane Spells

I will have to admit that at this point, my brain just started shouting out “my God, the tedium!” I know that these rules are core to a caster’s mission in life. How they prepare spells, what the limits are to casting, how they’re recorded in the spellbook, etc.

But the writing is terribly terribly dull. For a book filled with iconic characters, I really wish they’d have used them more to provide flavor and examples.

Still:

Preparing Spells


You must rest for 8 hours, and then take 15 – 60 minutes to prepare your slots. Somewhere buried in there (Prepared Spell Retention) it gives what is a pretty good explanation for this “memorization” thing. You are actually effectively partially casting, and then “hanging” the spell, subject to finalization and execution later.

I should note that the new(ish) GURPS magic system introduced in Monster Hunters – Ritual Path Magic – has something very, very like this. You take the time and energy to cast a spell into a focus, called a charm or dweomer, and then when it’s time to cast the spell, you crush or otherwise activate the item. Spells can take a long time to prepare, and the ability to generate a monster (ahem) spell repertoire is limited to your magic power and really how much time your friends will let you spend muttering incantations before you head out to kill stuff.

If you’re playing a wizard or sorcerer – or any spellcaster, since the rules for Divine spellcasting are best summarized as ‘exactly the same thing, with this small handful of changes – you will want to read these rules a few times, and discuss them with your GM to see if he has any house rules to (hopefully) smooth things along in game.

Short version though. You rest for the night (8 hours), you spend about an hour to prepare stuff. If you’re disrupted in your rest you either need to make it up or prepare fewer spells. It seems to take roughly 60-90 seconds per spell regardless of level (about an hour, maximum of 40-60 spells total memorized, ish).

You can leave spell slots open and prepare them later. If you are facing a journey where you can make frequent stops of about an hour, this might be the best way to ensure you don’t leave yourself utterly without the ability to be flexible. It still takes at least 15 minutes to get this done, and you may not abandon a previously memorized spell in this process. You may only fill an empty slot.

Spellbooks



The rules put a lot of thought into the wizard’s spellbook, which is exactly 100 pages, no more, no less. Each spell, from zero-level to 9th level, is one page. Magical writing is a sort of personal arcane shorthand that has as much to do with how your character interprets magic as with any sort of formalism. Thus, it takes a bit to unravel another wizard’s shorthand, which is why it takes so darn long to read them.

It’s a neat trick – DC 20 + the spell level.

You can also prepare a spell from another person’s book, but you have to make a Spellcraft check (DC 15+level) to do it. Copying a spell is a similar check, but it costs a bunch of money: square the spell’s level x 10 gp (5 gp flat cost for 0-level spells). You must be writing in solid gold ink or something – or the ink itself is magical. Still, as they say in my neck of the woods, that’s ‘spendy.’

You can sell a spellbook as loot for half the gp cost of all the spells it contains. The spellbook of a powerful caster that might have 4 spells per level x all 10 possible levels of spells is worth about 5700gp. Not bad as treasure.

Divine Spells

Pretty much just like Arcane spells, but you prepare them at a time of your choosing instead of right when you wake up. Also, any spell slot of appropriate level or higher can be used to cast a healing (or inflict harm) type spell, so you don’t need to prepare those in advance, per se, but you will need to decide what you need to give up as you go. This also works for summon nature’s ally if you’re a druid.

Special Abilities

Some abilities mimic that of spells in certain ways.
Spell-like Abilities are not exactly spells, but duplicate the function of a spell and are definitely magical in nature. You can just ‘turn them on’ with a standard action with no verbal, somatic, material, or focus requirement, and they do not provoke Attacks of Opportunity. However, they can be dispelled and don’t work in areas that disallow magic. 
Supernatural Abilities cannot be disrupted in combat – so they’re wicked cool – and thus aren’t subject to spell resistance or dispel magic, but they don’t function in antimagic areas.
Extraordinary Abilities may look like spells and feel like spells, but they’re not. They’re not magical, can’t be dispelled, don’t suffer the effects of antimagic or dispel magic . . . basically they break the laws of physics for reasons that are not magical or anything. 
Parting Shot


While this chapter is critical to understanding and playing spell-users in Pathfinder, it’s quite a slog to get through. Still, while there are many rules, there seem to be relatively few special cases, so once you assimilate the laws of magic, so to speak, you should be good to go for the rest of your Pathfinder career – unless other books that aren’t the Core Rulebook change that!

A retroactive (and oft-repeated) introduction: After an actual-play hiatus where I was mostly writing and playtesting for GURPS. I was invited to play in a Pathfinder game, and after a few sessions, it was time to buy the book and learn the rules! I decided to try and read the Pathfinder rules cover-to-cover and see what inspiration strikes, for good or ill!

This is a compilation of the links to read-throughs of Pathfinder-related material


Pathfinder Core Rulebook

0.  Prelude
1.  Introduction
2.  Races


3a. Classes (Barbarian – Monk)
3b. Classes (Paladin – Wizard)

******

When last we left our heroes, we were just finishing up the section on recovering from wounds in the Combat chapter, with some snarky notes on so-called “non-lethal” damage. Ah, well, Pathfinder isn’t the only game to make that mistake, and so we continue.

Movement, Position, and Distance

The game first drops something that’s not really a surprise, but is one of those “oh, OK, then” moments. It basically requires, or at least strongly encourages, miniatures and a mapboard to play, and even gives you the desired scale of the minis: 30mm.
In any event, the game is resolved on a square grid with 5′ squares, and you basically take your move, modify it for your size and any special encumbrance you have, and divide by 5′, and you get that many squares. For most PCs, that number is likely six.
Diagonal movement counts 3 squares for every 2 squares traversed, but it’s broken up as your first diagonal only costs 1 square, but your second – no matter where in the sequence it comes – counts as 2 squares. So net/net, you pay the right amount. Don’t do the “1-2-1-2-1” thing through difficult terrain, though – if you’re doing that, move costs are doubled, so each diagonal costs you the full 3 squares, rather than something staggered.
Moving Through a Square

Now we get into special case land. It’s probably wise to note down the things your character will expect to do a lot, and jot down the rules. You can always move through a friend, unless you’re charging. You can’t move through a foe, unless he’s helpless. Or big. You can’t put two critters in one 5′ square, again unless he’s helpless. If you’re trying an “overrun,” you can try and move through hs hex, but it might backfire on you. You can move through a foe’s hex if you’re using acrobatics, or you’re fine, diminutive, or tiny. 
Got that? Oh, well, sometimes it’s wrong, but exceptions will be noted.
Critter Size

While big guys are easy (they fill their squares, so stay out), you can jam 4 Tiny guys, 25 Diminutives, or 100 Fine nasties in one 5′ square, and by and large they can’t reach into adjacent squared to attack, so they have to enter your hex, provoke an attack of opportunity, live through it, and then crawl up your pant leg.
The only other thing to note about large guys is that using natural attacks, instead of weapons, they threaten not just the ring of squares 10′ away, but the adjacent squares as well. Take note, be warned, etc. You’re not safe one square away from these guys.
Combat Modifiers

The game differentiates mechanically between cover and concealment, which should please my infantryman friends. However, the flat distribution of die rolls makes this interesting. Wait and see.
For Cover, you basically pick a corner of your own square (naturally the most advantageous one), and if the line from that corner to any corner of your foe’s occupied squares passes through a wall or other hard obstacle, then your foe has some sort of cover.
If the entire foe is occluded, you can’t attack him at all. If up to 50% is covered (partial cover), your foe gets +2 to his AC, and if from 50-99% is covered, he gets +4. There are some picky rules about half-height obstacles, and covered foes can get bonuses to Reflex saves (+2) under some circumstances. There’s also improved cover which can give +8 to your foe’s AC, but that’s GM discretion for things like arrow slits.
Note that what full cover does, effectively, is make your foe 20% more difficult to hit. 
For Concealment, you’re more or less using the same resolution mechanics, but when you’re done, a concealed foe rolls d% and you miss 20% of the time, or 50% of the time if you’re shooting into a totally concealed square that contains your foe but you can’t see him.
That’s not quite the same as “you’re 20% more difficult to hit,” since that AC adjustment can take you from (say) hitting 50% of the time to hitting 30% of the time. With the “you miss 20% of your hits,” you’d go from hitting 50% of the time to hitting (50% hit rate x [1-20% miss rate] = ) 40% of the time.  If you were hitting 80% of the time, you’d be down to 64%, but if you only had a 20% chance to hit to begin with (say, 1d20 vs AC 17) then rather than it being basically impossible for you to hit (1d20 vs AC 21) you could still roll a potential hit 20% of the time, but 20% of those hits would convert to misses – a 12% net chance of success.
So concealment is similar in resolution but less harsh mechanically.
Flanking

In melee combat, if you and a friend are threatening the other guy from opposite sides, you’re flanking him, and you get +2 to hit. Pretty sure that if you and a buddy are flanking a foe, you get to apply your Sneak Attack damage, so ths one’s pretty key. 
Note that just being “behind” someone doesn’t seem to qualify (at least, not at this point in the rules). You need to be splitting his attention between two people.
Special Attacks
The last sprint to the finish contains a bunch of special attack types, including Aid Another, Charge, Combat Maneuvers, Feint, Mounted Combat, Throw Splash Weapon, and Two-Weapon Fighting.

Aid Another: You and your buds can make attacks vs AC 10, and each one that succeeds can give a designated friend either +2 to his hit roll or +2 to his AC, and those adds stack. 
Charge: Near as I can tell, using a full action you can travel up to 2x your normal move, but only in a straight line unhindered by any obstacles or difficult terrain. You need to end in attack range, whereupon you get +2 to your hit roll and -2 to your AC. You may only attack once. If you’re using a lance (pay attention, knight wannabees) while mounted, you do double damage by default. If you’re charging a group of guys with braced weapons, you’re going to be on the receiving end of said double damage.
Feint:  As +Fred Brackin pointed out many moons ago, this important special attack, if successul, denies your foe his DEX bonus on the subsequent turn. Since lots of nifty Rogue and certain Archer abilities are keyed to “your foe loses his DEX bonus,” this is a great way to benefit from things like Sneak Attack without having to flank or stealth your way into place. It’s Bluff on your end, vs. 10+BAB+Wisdom modifier, or 10+Sense Motive bonus if it’s higher.
Mounted Combat: Mounts have some nice features. They act on your Initiative, and when they move (and ergo, you go along for the ride), they use up their own move action, not yours. That being said, you only ever get one attack while mounted if you also move, but you may still charge, and if you’re striking down at a foe, you get a +1. You can still hack away with multiple attacks if you only take your five-foot step, though.
Throw Splash Weapon: The Alchemist’s favorite. You can toss something that does a bunch of nastiness and it will do direct damage to whomever it hits as a ranged touch attack and splashes everyone within five feet of that individual. You may also target the vertex of a square at only AC 5. You lose your chance to do direct damage, but hey, AC 5, and you splash the four squares attached to that vertex. Your GM will afterwards keep proper separation between his NPCs; or the PCs will do likewise if they’re on the receiving end of this. 
Two-Weapon Fighting: The Ranger’s fave, basically anyone can do this, but the penalties can suck. If you have a light weapon in your off hand, it gets better, if you have the Two-Weapon Fighting feat, it’s better still, and if you combine ’em, you can attack twice at only -2 each. Since that’s only a 10% loss to success chances, unless your chances of hitting are worse than 25%, you will want to use two weapons if you are only -2 to hit. If you only have Two-Weapon fighting, you are at -4 to each attack, and so you make one attack if your chance of success on a single attack is worse than 50%. Your odds of missing with both double-weapon attacks are larger than your odds of missing with your single shot. On the high end, swing twice, always. Untrained, it’s never better to use two weapons without the feat unless you effectively can’t fail. That’s not a sophisticated damage per attack round analysis, though, just a “don’t miss” one. Properly, you’d take the weighted average damage of one hit vs. the weighted average (at reduced hit chance) of two, which can have two hits, one hit, or none. Not in the mood tonight.

In the comments section, +Fred Brackin does a pretty good job of demolishing Two-Weapon Fighting as a good plan. While the straight-up to-hit odds sorta favor you in the first analysis as above, he does a better calculation vs a typical armor class in terms of damage over ten rounds. He also makes the point of what you give up to get this two-weapon ability by selecting a feat, as well as the AC bonus from a shield. Plus, two-handed weapons like greatswords kinda rock. Scroll down and read the whole thing, and you might come to the conclusion that two-weapon fighting is a waste of time!

Combat Manuevers

This deserves its own section. You can do one of these using your Combat Maneuver Bonus, equal to your BAB+STR modifier+any special size modifier, and bigger is better. On the Defense, your target number benefits from both STR and DEX, and once again size helps.
What can you do?
Bull Rush: As part of a standard action or charge, you can try and push a foe straight back without doing any harm. This is football. You can theoretically even bull rush two or more foes, if you can absorb the -4 penalty per critter, but you get a new roll each time.
Disarm: Doing this provokes an attack of opportunity. But the value is obvious if you can pull it off. If you win, he drops one item of your choice; win by 10, and both hands are empty. Fail by 10 or more, and you disarm yourself. Oops. If you managed to do this while unarmed yourself, you can take the weapon from him and keep it, automatically. 
Grapple: Provokes an Attack of Opportunity. If you win, you change his state to grappled. He can’t move, is -4 to DEX, and -2 to all attacks that don’t involve breaking the grapple. See p. 567. Actually, don’t. See here instead (this online rules stuff is kinda cool at times). From grappled, you can also Move him, damage him with an unarmed attack, pin him, or even tie him up. Go go gadget bondage!
Overrun: This is one way to move through a foe’s hex without his permission. He can get out of the way, which lets you pass. If you win the maneuver check, you go through, win by 5 or more, you knock him prone.

Sunder: Break his stuff! Make an attack on his weapon, and you can damage or destroy it.
Trip: An attempt to knock your foe prone from up close, as opposed to an accidental/extra-good result of an Overrun. 
Special Initiative Actions

There are a few things you can also do with turn order.
Delay: This voluntarily sets your initiative to a lower number than what you rolled for the rest of the combat. You can do this multiple times, reducing (but never raising) your Initiative number.
Ready: Prepare to take a specified action at some time between your initiative count and your next turn. This one also resets your initiative count, but only (I think) if you actually interrupt another character with your action. So you have Init 17, and you’re waiting for that spellcaster to poke his face out of cover on Init 8 to shoot him with an arrow. He pokes out on his turn, and you shot him in the face. Your Initiative is now effectively 8.1 – you go right before the wizard, for the rest of the combat.
You can attack spellcasters to distract them, you can ready counterspells, and you can also ready weapons against a charge – and you go first, assuming your reach is longer than his . . . 
Parting Shot
And that’s the combat chapter! I’ve already learned some new things, so it was definitely worthwhile. Still a lot of special cases, which you can and should avoid by Being a Better Player. A bit of pre-prep in a game as rules-exception heavy as this one can go a long way. 

Today we played Pathfinder Pirates, continuing the Skull and Shackles Path. On board were +Jeromy French , +Matt Sutton , +kung fu hillbilly , and +Joshua Taylor .

We more or less talked our way through the session, trying to remember where we’d left off. In the end, we captured a target pirate we’d needed to capture, brought his severed head back to Tidewater Rock, and took over the place by bargain and threat.

We now have two ships to our name (and renamed the second ship, with great irony, “A Simple Plan”, and the desire to fortify and improve Tidewater Rock as our base of operations. The “keep” on that place is more of a tower, and it’s pretty sparse for fortifications, supplies, and the things that would make it a viable base of operations.

So, we are now, I think, on a major deviation from the Adventure Path (though maybe not), and we’re hooking up with some NPCs we befriended (or at least didn’t rob, kill, or both) in our past, looking for a smith, a shipwright or three, and some engineers and masons to help turn our little island into something to fear.

And if that isn’t fun enough, we discovered Google Goofiness. So from now on, I think at least a few of us will be using Roll20 and the associated plug-ins to ensure maximum piratical behavior.

I’m “Pel,” on the left. Makes me want to grow my goatee back.

A retroactive (and oft-repeated) introduction: After an actual-play hiatus where I was mostly writing and playtesting for GURPS. I was invited to play in a Pathfinder game, and after a few sessions, it was time to buy the book and learn the rules! I decided to try and read the Pathfinder rules cover-to-cover and see what inspiration strikes, for good or ill!

This is a compilation of the links to read-throughs of Pathfinder-related material

Pathfinder Core Rulebook

0.  Prelude
1.  Introduction
2.  Races


3a. Classes (Barbarian – Monk)
3b. Classes (Paladin – Wizard)

Please make any comments you have at the individual entries!

*************
Chapter 8: Combat

This one’s going to be a doozy. The Combat chapter. That which more or less defines the D&D paradigm, unless it’s the Vancian fire-and-forget magic system (which is, I believe, the single longest chapter in the book; that spell list goes on-and-on like a Journey song).

But, nonetheless, we wade into the fray like a Raging Barbarian. While combat isn’t the only conflict resolution mechanism in Pathfinder, in the few games I’ve played, it is by far the most common. The Combat chapter is 25 pages long, which isn’t that bad, really. 

I’ll cover some basics as I go, commenting on major mechanics and sections – but read the entire thing, maybe twice. A cheat-sheet wouldn’t hurt, but I bet someone’s created one already!

How Combat Works

Combat proceeds according to a very specific cycle. First determine initiative: Roll 1d20 and add any Initiative bonuses you get. You will act in descending order of initiative. However, before you get to the part where that happens, anyone not aware of his attackers gets to get ganked by the rest in the surprise round. After that, combat starts for real, round by round.

The Combat Round


Six seconds of regular time. Somewhat like GURPS, the turns are sort of interleaved, since if you throw a spell or do something that lasts for (say) four rounds, it lasts from the moment you act to just before you act the fifth time, when the effect ends. That’s a subtlety I didn’t know.

Attacks of Opportunity are a bit the odd men out, since they can disrupt normal turn order. More on those later.

Initiative and Surprise


The first round, or more precisely, before the first round starts, gives all sorts of opportunity – though brief – for havoc and mayhem. There’s a surprise round that comes first, where characters who are aware of their foes can act, while those unaware cannot. There are definite benefits to this, as well as to going first in the Initiative order: all foes are “flat footed,” meaning they lose their DEX bonus to AC (opening them up to things like Rogue’s Sneak Attack ability) and cannot make Attacks of Opportunity until they are no longer flat-footed.

Catching your foes flat-footed, or making them take on that status, is a big deal for Rogues.

During the surprise round, if you are aware of foes you can take any move, free, or standard action.

Combat Statistics


The good stuff. Bringin’ the smackdown, Pathfinder style. 

The core mechanic, no matter what Feats or other things might prove for special exceptions or modifications, is straightforward: Roll 1d20 plus a bunch of modifiers with a target number that must equal or beat your target’s Armor Class (AC). While there are lots of if/then to what you may add or subtract, this and the damage roll are the basic things you do.

This is, in its way, similar to GURPS, though it might be even fewer mechanics. GURPS has four basic mechanics: the skill test (roll 3d6 under a target number, most often skill), the skill Contest (roll 3d6 vs. a target, your opponent does the same, whomever has the highest margin of success wins), the Reaction Roll (3d6, higher is better), and the damage roll (Nd6).

Automatic: A 1 is always a miss; a 20 is always a hit, and might be a critical hit. I’m used to a natural 1 being something truly bad, but the designers (correctly, I think) decided a 1 in 20 chance for a 14th level fighter to do something crazy like lop off his own leg is kinda dumb.

Attacking: Base Attack Bonus + STR modifier (if melee) or DEX modifier (if ranged) + size modifier + range penalties (if ranged)

“Defending”: In quotes because it’s totally passive (but see below). 10+Armor+Shield+DEX+other special mods. Note that on p. 184 you can fight defensively. Declare it on your turn, and you take -4 to all your attacks in exchange for a +2 dodge bonus to your AC. More on this when variant attacks come up.

Personally, I’d shake this up a bit! I’d allow you to trade your Base Attack Bonus 2:1 for an AC bonus due to defensive dodging. So a 14th-level fighter, with BAB of +14, could trade that for +7 to AC. Of course, his three attacks are now at 0/-5/-10 . . .

Smackdown: Damage rolls are based on the weapon. Your Base Attack Bonus does not add to damage, but your STR bonuses do . . . except if you’re using a bow or crossbow. A composite bow can get a STR bonus, but not any other sort.

Again, I don’t much like this. if a bow is keyed to your STR (and it should be), then you should be able to get more damage from a stronger bow. Maybe a composite bow gets a 1:1 STR bonus, and regular bows only get half the bonus for STR or something, but if you’re STR 18 instead of STR 10, your arrows should go farther and hit harder.Granted, my biases here should be well known.

You do get extra STR bonus if you use a weapon with two hands (except a light weapon), so that’s a good thing to remember. That +4 STR bonus turns into +6 with a two-handed sword!

On the flip side, you only get half your bonus with your off-hand.

Ouchitude: You have Hit Points. When you get to zero, you’re incapacitated. Negative and your dying, and if you get to -CON you’re dead.

Personally, I’d like to have a wider range between “I’m up and fully active!” at even but 1 HP, incapacitated at precisely zero, dying at negative and dead when you’re at -CON. 

Attacks of Opportunity

This definitely deserves it’s own space. Attacks of opportunity are ways to ensure that the nature of the Pathfinder combat round (abstracted and 6 seconds long) doesn’t engender some silly emergent behavior, such as being able to run past a fully armed and aware foe because your move is 30′ and it’s your turn and not his.

Attacks of Opportunity come in more or less three flavors

Cut-down Attack of Opportunity List
  1. Leaving (but not entering) a threatened square  (Note: the link is a great visualization of the threat area, and makes me understand it much more completely)
  2. An unarmed attack on an armed opponent.

    This is, to me, precisely analogous to a few things that will happen to you in GURPS, not the least of which is that armed parries on unarmed attacks that aren’t strikers are “aggressive,” or damaging, parries automatically.

  3. Doing something – nearly anything – that doesn’t involve keeping a wary eye and a ready weapon to your foe. This is referred to as a Distracting Act in the rules. This is where most of the persnickety rules will come in.
I’ve cut the list from the Pathfinder Reference Document down to those with a “Yes,” under Attacks of Opportunity. If it’s not in the PRD, it’s not on the list. If it’s in the PRD but doesn’t provoke an Attack of Opportunity, I cut it. I did leave some categories that are explicitly “No” in there, one of which is “Take a 5-foot Step” (not shown explicitly, it’s a No Action action).

By the way, the PRD document with AoO in there is totally pasteable into Excel, as it seems to be raw HTML. So sorting it by yes/no is a trivial thing. Recommended.

You can see that a lot of the stuff involves skill use, rooting around in your pack, and a lot of spell and magic item use. I’m tempted to over-generalize that you’re likely going to provoke an Attack if you’re not directly related to smacking down your foe, but I’m sure there are some exceptions the rule. Might want to keep a copy of the full list handy, either in hardcopy or a window link to the PRD.
How Many: One per round. That’s the “may provoke an attack of opportunity” part of the rules, even though the book and table says “Yes.” If you have the Combat Reflexes feat, you can add your DEX bonus to the number you can make (meaning it’s a pretty cool feat if foes are trying to get by you). But by and large, you get one per round.
Saving Throws: Your way of reducing an “unusual or magical” attack. It’s not Armor Class.It functions as your Base Attack Bonus against physical punishment (a lot like a HT roll in GURPS), stuff you have to leap out of the way to avoid, such as some traps (Acrobatic Dodge in GURPS? Maybe a DX roll), and mental or supernatural resistance (a Will roll in GURPS). The Difficulty Class of the task depends on what you’re doing.
Actions in Combat

You can always do one move and one standard action, or a Full-Round action. In addition, you may also perform one swift action and one or more free actions. A move action is also sort of a standard action subtype, so you can, if you like, do two of them if you don’t plan to attack.

Standard Actions: most stuff, like attacks

Move Action: If you don’t otherwise move, you get a No Action 5-foot step somewhere before, during, or after a standard action. This can be pretty key to maintaining your distance from foes.

Full-Round Action: It consumes your entire round. Well, except for swift and free actions. And maybe you can take a step – except when you can’t. This paragraph on p. 181 is both muddled and clear at the same time, which is a neat trick.

Free Action: Drop stuff, drop your concentration on a spell, drop to the floor, prepare spell components, and speak. You can do any or all of these on your turn subject to Rule Zero.

Swift Action: You only get one of these (casting a quickened spell is the only example) but it doesn’t interfere with any other actions you’re allowed to take.

Immediate Action: A swift action you can take at any time, not just on your turn. Handy. Casting Feather Fall is the only example given, but it would seem logical that reaction spells and other things would qualify.

No Action, or Not an Action: Interestingly, nocking an arrow as part of an attack with a bow is the example given here of something that doesn’t even bother talking about in the time scale. In GURPS, It’s two full seconds – one to draw the arrow, another to ready the bow! Granted that’s two of six seconds, but “not worth quantifying” is interesting. Other examples are Delay and making a 5-foot step.

Standard Actions


Attacks

Most of what you’ll be doing – not all of it, but seemingly most – in melee combat are Standard Actions.  Some key excerpts:

  • Armed melee attacks are standard actions with a 5-foot range, unless you have reach.
  • Unarmed melee attacks provoke an attack of opportunity which happens first, unless you have the Improved Unarmed Strike feat. Also, unarmed attacks do non-lethal damage. And not much of it at that. If you want lethal damage you can have it, but at -4 to hit.
  • Ranged weapons can be thrown five range increments or shot (like bows) 10. That means a composite bow with a 100′ range can shoot 1,000′ or about 330yds. Might be a little bit far, but not out-of-the-question far.
  • Natural attacks such as claws, bites, and tails and wings have a bunch of special caveats that bear reading if these are your attack modes, or you have, say, a Velociraptor Animal Companion that uses them.
  • Multiple attacks are full-round actions, not standard actions. So if you want to be Sir Cuisinart, you’ll give up some freedom of choice
  • It’s -4 to shoot into a melee unless your target is a lot bigger than the other. The rules say “-2 if your target is two sizes larger,” but I’d just say it’s -4 plus the difference in size of your target relative to the foes around him. That scales both ways.
  • This is where Fighting Defensively (mentioned above) is mentioned
  • Roll a 20 and you might have scored a critical hit. Note that some damage types, like a Rogue’s sneak attack, are not multiplied, so read carefully
Magic Items and Casting Spells

Both are standard actions, mostly, and mostly they both provoke attacks of opportunity. Highlights
  • Spell-Triggers, Command Word, and Use-Activated items don’t count as activation; they’re standard actions, I think, but don’t provoke Opportunity attacks
  • “Did I break your concentration?” See Chapter 9 for the Difficulty Class of things that can interrupt you
  • Spells cast as a standard action take effect as immediately as a sword thrust to the guts, which is to say right the heck away.
  • Get thwacked while casting and the DC is 10+damage+spell level. 10 points of damage casting a level 4 spell is a DC 24 check. Yow.
  • Casting on the Defensive: Huh? I’m not sure this is well defined.
  • Touch attacks with a spell are considered to be armed and thus don’t provoke Attacks of Opportunity. Hmmm.
  • You can hold a spell if you don’t want to use it right away, but your hand is now a live wire, and the spell will hit what you touch
Splitting Full-Round Actions

Good for self-consistency, you can split a full-round action into two standard actions, one at the end of Turn A, and the other standard action as the first one of Turn B. This doesn’t apply to Full Attack, charge (why not?), run, or withdraw.
Total Defense

This must be what “on the defensive” means? Anyway, +4 dodge bonus to AC in exchange for, I think, not being able to attack. This can’t be combined with fighting defensively. If you allow the 2:1 exchange I suggest above, this needs to be “adds BAB to AC as Dodge bonus.” This suggests that if anything, maybe the “exchange ratios” need to be more like 1:4 and 1:2 instead of 1:2 and 1:1.
Other Stuff

Without going into details, using a special ability is basically attack-like, move is a standard action, drawing or sheathing a weapon is a move standard action, but may be combined with a move if you have a BAB of +1 or higher. 
Full-Round Actions

Skipping the gory details, if you’re attacking a lot, it’s Full-Round. Some spells are full-round actions. Stepping through difficult terrain is too. One fun one is the Withdraw option, which is running the hell away from combat (2x distance). Not sure what that’s all about, other than the free “you can leave your current hex w/o provoking an attack” thing.
Miscellany

Lots of other descriptions follow, and they’re worth reading, of course.

Injury and Death

Ah, the “what are Hit Points” discussion. Here we go. The short version is as long as you have 1 HP left, you’re fine, good to go, have at ’em. Get to 0 HP and your disabled, go negative and you’re KO’d, and hit a negative HP total equal to your CON, and you die. Rapid transtion from “fully capable” to “deader than hell.”

A massive damage optional rule that says if you take 50HP or half your HP in one blow, whichever is more, you’re dead.

At 0 HP, you’re staggered, can only take one move action, no standard actions without injuring yourself (and thus KO)

If you’re dying, you drop unconscious and lose 1 HP per second until you die or stabilize, but this HP loss is the result of a failed Constitution check, DC 10 plus your negative HP total. If you succeed or roll a 20, no HP loss this turn. Fail, and lose 1 HP. You can be stabilized permanently using magic (any healing stabilizes you) or making a DC 15 Heal check.

Dead, well. Fairly self explanatory.

Natural Healing


1 HP per level per 8 hours of sleep at night. Ability score damage also recovers at one point per ability score per night. Nonlethal damage heals at 1 HP per hour per character level. You get better from a bruisin’ pretty quick at high level, eh?

Non-lethal damage my ass. This is something GURPS gets right, I think, though the frequency of taking such lethal injury from some blows, like punches, is too high.

*****
I’m going to break this one into two parts, due to length. More on Combat later!

We picked up from +kung fu hillbilly‘s new Pathfinder campaign with +Matt Sutton joining us (apparently he’d been there all along, but he’s a Dwarf, so we apparently never looked down).

We started to wander out to hide in a tree by the exit, only to find our way blocked by a 25-odd foot bear. An angry bear. We started to fight, and Alverior ( +Douglas Cole ) tried to back off to get more room to use his bow, provoking an attack of opportunity. The bear hit him, and he went from 8 HP down to -1 in one blow, like the good first-level practice dummy he is.

Fortunately, the party consists of two clerics, who healed Alverior up right quick. We proceeded to turn the bear into a chopped up pincushion, Kalyl hit him with a few ice balls (earning him the nickname “Snowball”), and Breg hit him with a ball of acid. Naturally, we managed to nearly completely block the hallway with it’s corpse. Oops.

The next morning, we woke, chopped off a bear paw for evidence, and the winter witch and Kalyl ( +Jeromy French ) and Breg Stonebeard ( +Matt Sutton ) traded barbs over whether or not to allow the Goblins to come back to their cave, and then cave it in. I think Berg noted that he had an issue with a Goblin lady, who strongly resembled Kalyl. Alverior backs off to let them have their holy war.

We go back to the Goblin camp, show off our paw, get a necklace of teeth and fingerbones that is supposed to convince the humans that war is averted, and head back to the human settlement.

We showed them the evidence, got offered jobs, refused them, got a 25gp payout, and that was that.

Alverior seems to be a nice fun potential character, once he gets out of the “one-hit wonder” status that is first level.

I completely forgot to snap a screenshot of our characters all trapped behind the token of the bear, which completely filled the 10′-wide corridor. We had a wee bit of an “oh, crap, now what?” moment when we realized that killing the prey right there in the corridor might have rendered us incapable of stopping the war between goblins and humans . . . on account of a giant bear ass in the way.

+kung fu hillbilly started up a new game, both to allow our usual PF GM to play ( +Jeromy French ) as well as, well, he wanted to run a game.

I think it’s set in Golarion, but as far as I can tell, we’re not on an Adventure Path, which works for me. I like sandboxes just fine.

Jaime’s guidance was more or less “out in the wilderness, little contact with anyone, better have good survival skills.”

A few others had fast ideas on characters they’d like to play, leaving me a bit behind. I volunteered to “play to type” a bit, and cover a bow-using Ranger type. Then Jeromy showed me the Elven Archer template/class, and I decided that was the right mix of fighter, ranger, and rogue for what I wanted.

I had a list of stuff I wanted, Elven Curved Blade, Composite Longbow with +2 STR bonus to match my own STR 14, masterwork bowyer’s tools.

Then I rolled 150gp instead of the nearly 300 I’d have needed to complete my stuff list.

So I decided to go almost entirely the other way. I showed up in the Inn that started the adventure with a bow, a light club, two empty quivers, an empty map case, crappy leather armor, and a pretty bad mood for an elf.

I retroactively decided that he had been in a warrior training group, a handful of youngish elves in training with a master. As part of survival training, they were teleported by the Loremasters from their home to this remote, desolate, Goblin-infested area to learn to survive. Kind of a field trip.

But they showed up in the middle of a Goblin raid or camp or something, the master and all his companions were killed, and only he got away, having lost much of his gear (but not his bowyer’s tools or bow).

It made for a nice, relatively dramatic entrance.

Play Summary

The first game was our usual two-hour affair. We met each other, and for the start it was only Jeromy’s half-elf winter witch, and my fully elven archer, isolated in a human settlement. That made for a very interesting dynamic.

We were interrupted in our introductions by the arrival of a fairly frantic woman with many kids in tow. She said her husband was dead, and that a Goblin band had broken a 20-year peace treaty by killing him.

We were recruited to head to the place and check it out. We agreed, and headed out. When we got there, there was lots of evidence of combat, but not really of a true raid. We even found the guy, dead, laid out on his kitchen table with healing bandages all over him. Food was missing, but nothing was really burned.

We tracked the Goblins back to their camp, where an epically failed Stealth roll on my part (oops) led the Chief to come say hello. Rather than fight, we talked, and heard they’d been driven out of their caves, where they’d been living happily, by some nameless un-killable (by them) devouring beast.

I went back to report to the town captain, and found they were busily preparing for war. I told them that they were overreacting, like humans do (hey: Elf. Arrogance is in our blood, you tiny mewling human piipsqueak) and if we could spare a few warriors, we could maybe chalk this up to “oops” and have less bloodshed.

As one would expect from these reactionary children, they were unimpressed. In true elf fashion, I left the room, hopefully in an enigmatic and infuriating fashion (hey, Elf. With CHA 9). Headed back to the farm, met up with my companions, and journeyed to the Goblin cave.

We explored the internals quickly, finding very little. The session ended with us leaving the cave to hang out and lurk outside, so we didn’t get pinned in a cave somewhere.

Ballistic’s Report


I like sandbox campaigns, and this one felt a lot less railroady than both the Adventure Paths I’ve played in (one in GURPS, one in Pathfinder). I feel like we can do nearly anything, even though the problem in front of us is pretty obvious: find monster, get beat up a bit, find monster’s weakness, hopefully kill monster or drive him away and avoid a war.

This’ll be a good diversion from the Skull and Shackles campaign Jeromy runs, and will let me explore Elfdom (elf-hood? elfitude?) as well as seeing if the mix of fighting and spells and woodcraft that is the Elven Archer is a good mix.